Sean Cornelisse, Dissident Peace; …ism, The Hague

A handshake of peace and friendship by Sean Cornelisse (right) with a visitor.

Only during the weekend (14-15 July) Sean Cornelisse shows his project Dissident Peace at …ism  project space (another relatively new artistic development in The Hague).

‘“Why are you here?” I asked him. “Why disrupt the serenity of this assembly with your sinister presence?” “I come,” he replied, “from a far away land, might find here the God of law, justice and peace, whose altar is said to be in The Hague.”’

‘Mister Tjoune, one of the Koreans who protested against not inviting Korea for the Peace Conference, has suddenly died Sunday night in his hotel at Wagenstraat in this city. He had an abscess on his cheek; this was taken away operatively. The operation very much overwhelmed Mister Tjoune, and he died of the effects. Already today his burial took place at “Eikenduinen.” No mourning relatives, no sympathising band of friends followed the small funeral procession. The only participants were the first member of the deputation, the vice-minister Yi-Sang-Sul, and the owner of the hotel where both stayed.’

The project is partially an homage to the Second Peace Convention of The Hague of 1907 and in particular to the still unclarified death on July 14th of the Korean would be representative Yi Jun, whose place of death at Wagenstraat is now the Yi Jun Peace Museum, which has become a place of pilgrimage to Korean visitors.

…ism’s project room has been refurbished in the style of the Yi Jun Museum and Korean tea is served with Korean biscuits.

Surabayan Commercial Paper ; State- and Literary Daily Paper of Dutch East India.

Cornelisse shows copies of local newspapers of the time, both reporting about and critical of the Convention, and with pictures of the Korean troika who wanted to take part but were refused at the instigation of the Japanese.

Cornelisse mixes the facts and the fiction with calligraphy somewhat reminiscent of Henri Michaux and with a fine touch of absurdism.

The Hague, July 3rd 2018.
With this despatch the Ministry of Foreign Affairs offers its apologies, in name of the cabinet and the King. It acknowledges that it has discredited the People´s Republic of Korea during the second peace convention at The Hague, June 1907. Recognising herewith to have an interest in the territory of Dutch East India. As an expression of goodwill we present all documentation about this to the National Archive for free.

Go there in peace, i’d say!

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Sean Cornelisse and …ism, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Graduation Festival 2018, Royal Academy of Art (KABK), The Hague

Quentley Barbara

I went to the Royal Academy of Art to write a review for Villa La Repubblica of this year’s graduation show of my old school. Click here to read the review in Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch).

Quentley Barbara

Like last few years the quality is quite high.

Quentley Barbara

So much so that our provincial town of The Hague can hardly swallow it.

Constantijn Scholten

As i have written quite extensively in Villa La Repubblica i leave you here with some things that caught my eye, including details of works by artists i discussed in the VLR review.

Constantijn Scholten

I wish all graduates the very best and i hope their work will gain some meaning in our harsh world.

Constantijn Scholten

Thursday July 12th is the last day you can see the show.

Sara Ceruti

Sara Ceruti

Sara Ceruti

Samira Saidi

Samira Saidi

Samira Saidi

Elza de Bruin

Elza de Bruin

Milda Vysniauskaite

Milda Vysniauskaite

Cristiana Vignatelli Bruni

Hsu Wai Lun

Hsu Wai Lun

Hsu Wai Lun

Leonie Schneider

Leonie Schneider

Leonie Schneider

Luuk Kuipers

Luuk Kuipers

Janne Schipper

Janne Schipper

Janne Schipper

Marina Heuvelman

Marina Heuvelman

Sam Andrea

Sam Andrea

Sam Andrea

Cedric ter Bals

Cedric ter Bals

Cedric ter Bals

Daniël Siegersma

Daniël Siegersma

Daniël Siegersma

Jonathan Hielkema

Jonathan Hielkema

Leandros Ntolas

Leandros Ntolas

Joana Schneider

Joana Schneider

Trijntje Noske

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and the Royal Academy of Art, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

The Future is Female; PARTS Project, The Hague

Aase Seidler Gernes

Surely “the future is female” may sound like a statement to which some people, notably males, might react with some fear.

Aase Seidler Gernes

However, whether one’s business is in seeds or in eggs, we all need a future and “the future is female” will certainly not imply a more peaceful future.

Sister Corita Kent

At best it would imply a bit of a more just future regarding the relationship between the sexes, and, let’s be fair, that is quite basic in life and society (as justice is always basic).

Katharina Grosse

Katharina Grosse

Does that have anything to do with the present exhibition at PARTS Project?

Karin Sander

Karin Sander

Not really, except that, apart from the text writer, the actors are an all female cast.

Sylvie Fleury

Sylvie Fleury

The texts (in Dutch) are by male artist Twan Janssen who regularly gives his thoughts about works of present day art on Facebook.

Yael Davids

Yael Davids

These thoughts are intuitive and personal, sometimes a bit poetic or philosophical.

Yael Davids

Rosemarie Trockel

Generally Janssen makes clear how the visual arts, this world of signs and meanings, can accompany human life and can have a personal impact on one’s ways of seeing.

Rosemarie Trockel

Lucia Tallova

In Janssen’s case it also means a lot of love for these signs and meanings, love he has in common with many an art collector.

Daniëlle Kwaaitaal

And that is how it is possible that for instance such sugar sweet works like Lily van der Stokker’s are in the same room as the once virgin canvasses that were sent into the world by Karin Sander to become stained and assaulted, as we all are, male or female.

Rose Wylie

Lily van der Stokker

The concept of intuitive and associative texts combined with works of art works very well.

AnneMarie van Splunter

Roos van Haaften

Text writer Janssen worked together closely with curator Francis Boeske and the result is this already 10th of the PARTS projects of which i sincerely hope there will be more in future, female or not.

Roos van Haaften

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists, the owners of the works and to PARTS Project, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #66

Apartment block Lübeckstraat corner 2de Sweelinckstraat.

Lübeckstraat is one of the streets that fell victim to the German Atlantic Wall during WWII.

The Dutch modernist architect Willem Dudok (1884-1974) made a master plan for the whole area for which different architects designed buildings in the 1950s.

I’m not sure who is responsible for this particular block but it has some fine details.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Theo Eissens, Linea Recta – From A to B; Livingstone gallery, The Hague

Writing these few lines the day after the death of Armando (1929-2018), the artist who constantly and painfully scratched remembrance’s wounds, the works by Theo Eissens (1952-2015) appear to me as typical for a post-war generation.

They knew about the remembrances of their parents, and so tried to objectify remembrance itself.

The screened photographs of certain cityscapes in Eissens’ work, whether they are in London or in Berlin, all bear the load of history.

Screen printed they become faint remembrances that crop up with the colours that in one way or another intuitively suit them.

As such the series on show presently at Livingstone Gallery becomes an amalgam of remembrance and intuition.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photograph courtesy to Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

James Brown, Orbs, views from my other House; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

James Brown‘s (1951) long career is one of searching, finding and researching; approaching from different artistic angles the idea of being.

Common thread in his work however seems to be leaving signs of human, handmade trials to understand life and in more recent years the cosmos.

Livingstone Gallery shows his ‘orb-paintings,’ works about the cosmos as it manifests itself to the human eye and as it can be interpreted by the human mind, helped by the human hand.

They are fascinating works, in which the idea of the orb and its constellation, so important to our existence, has become an abstract, painterly sign.

Best is, however, as always, to take a look yourself!

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Contents of all photographs courtesy to James Brown and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Concepts of Time; National Archaeology Museum, Hooglandse Kerkgracht, LUMC, Leiden

Juliaan Andeweg

This year’s Beelden in Leiden (Sculptures in Leiden) summer show is called Concepts of Time as the venerable National Archaeological Museum (Rijksmuseum van Oudheden) in the city is celebrating its two hundred years anniversary.

Juliaan Andeweg

Part of the exhibition is on show in the museum and that is where i started my own visit.

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg (1986) surely was lucky being able to install his work in the Museum’s Egyptian temple.

Juliaan Andeweg

Works by other artists are on show in a separate hall.

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos (1980) made a sculpture specially for the exhibition in his by now well known vocabulary full of inner conflict and search for harmony.

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets (1983) undeniably has a place in a show in the Archaeological Museum full of mythology.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster (1987) is also an artist that springs to mind when thinking about archaeology and time.

Emma van der Put

Emma van der Put

Emma van der Put’s (1988) video is about sculpture and the instability of vision.

Bastienne Kramer

Bastienne Kramer (1961) has a wall for a series of small objects based on the feminine in sculpture from the early days of humanity up to the present.

Bastienne Kramer

There are also two big sculptures by her on show.

Daniëlle van Ark

Daniëlle van Ark (1974) gives a photographic reinterpretation of Michelangelo’s David’s hand.

Bastienne Kramer

Bastienne Kramer

Jasper Hagenaar

Painter Jasper Hagenaar (1977) paints his own self imagined mythologies.

Jasper Hagenaar

The exhibition in the museum is modest but diverse and may give the visitor to the museum some interesting afterthoughts about the present as part of history and archaeology.

Damian Kapojos

Beelden in Leiden’s home base is Hooglandse Kerkgracht, a closed canal turned into an intimate, leafy avenue.

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

At the north end of the canal the show starts with another, bigger work by Kapojos, like the one in the museum looking like a complete cosmos elegantly kept in balance.

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yaïr Callender (1987) is still in his mood of floating, sleeping, dreaming and the world of mythology and mystique it creates.

Jonathan van Doornum

Jonathan van Doornum

One of the more severe works (but uncertain about the will of a stern god) is by Jonathan van Doornum (1987).

Rein Verhoef

Rein Verhoef

Rein Verhoef

There is a certain strictness in this work by Rein Verhoef (1989) too, but of quite a different kind; it looks quite self-evident and the care with which it is made, makes it almost sensual.

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

In her fountain-like work Smeets tries to find yet another basic narrative language.

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels (1983) made a batman as a sentinel, his ears vaguely reminiscing the guarding Anubis’ ears.

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen (1987) apparently used Indo-Pacific carving as the base for two poles painted completely white, standing to wait for ancestors that still have to be born.

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

In Andeweg’s installation i missed the promised “bottle with imitation water,” but it is all the more intriguing.

Lillian Vlaun

Lillian Vlaun (1993) quasi-reconstructed a vase in materials that are not what they seem to be.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Koster has an ornamented circle or lid in front of the magnificent gothic facade of the north transept of the 15th century Hooglandse Kerk; the scarab on the circle being a reminder of time.

Lillian Vlaun

The Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC) is the third venue for Concepts of Time.

Alexandra Hunts & Anna Fijnstein

The place, although sympathetic, is not photography friendly, so here is a choice of the more or less photographable works.

Alexandra Hunts & Anna Fijnstein

Alexandra Hunts (1990) and Anna Frijstein (1991) made a number of variations on the Willendorf Venus.

Sander van Noort

Sander van Noort (1986), originally a painter, now also makes sculptures based on classical sculpture.

Jonathan van Doornum

Jasper Hagenaar

Sander van Noort

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Bas de Wit

There are also sculptures by Bas de Wit (1977) who seem to lead a life apart from reality.

Jasper Hagenaar

Bas de Wit

Daniëlle van Ark

Nynke Koster

Generally curator Sandrine van Noort (curator of the LUMC art collection) has made a very strong choice, avoiding easy sentimentalism and easy art that should appeal to different target audiences.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

There is a strong sense of history being part of the contemporary world, and there is place for mysticism, mythology and ideas about craftsmanship in present day art practice.

Nynke Koster

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Beelden in Leiden.

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #65

Apartment building Laan van Meerdervoort corner Waldeck-Pyrmontkade.

Designed by Jan Olthuis – an architect who was born in the mid 19th century and who has designed more buildings in The Hague, but about whom not much is known biographically – it was built in 1902/1903 in the very decorative Art Nouveau style.

With its flamboyant cinnamon coloured engineering bricks and its tiled tableaus in pastel colours it is a real landmark at the crossroads of the two avenues.

In the 1930s shops were built on the ground floor.

Olthuis was responsible for the design of at least some of the tableaus.

The tiles themselves were produced by the firm ‘Thooft and Labouchere in its famous factory De Porceleyne Fles (internationally nowadays known as ‘Royal Delft’) in Delft. (the Dutch Cultural Heritage Agency wrongly states that the tiles were made by the Rozenburg ceramics factory in The Hague).

The building is a state monument and was restored in the 1990s and recently.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters