Manfred Schneider, Train your mental eraser, hippie; Livingstone Gallery, The Hague

At the moment German artist Manfred Schneider (1959) has an exhibition at Livingstone Gallery which shows quite recent and older works.

Schneider works in different disciplines and usually it deals with the discrepancies of the past and the present (and aren’t we all dealing with that?).

Schneider is fully aware that the present can only be understood and interpreted with knowledge of the past and he does so in a postmodern language which is not pretentious.

It makes for a show with very heterogeneous works with a sometimes dark kind of humour.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Manfred Schneider and Livingstone Gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Steinar Haga Kristensen, Bruine periode – Liegen en opscheppen (Brown Period – Lying and Bragging); 1646, The Hague

Some art, in spite of being made by an obviously inspired, skilled, talented, knowledgeable and hard working artist, just doesn’t ring a bell with me.

Which is the case with Steinar Haga Kristensen’s show Bruine periode – Liegen en opscheppen (Brown Period – Lying and Bragging) presently at 1646.

It may have something to do with the somewhat dilapidated style of painting, old fashioned expressionist and a bit folk-arty, colourful but worn out and a bit empty.

But well, do take a look for yourself. If you feel inspired by these pictures, you may draw different conclusions..

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Steinar Haga Kristensen and 1646, Den Haag.

 

Bertus Pieters

Sara Vrugt, Collateralen (Collaterals); Heden, The Hague

In the basement of Heden Sara Vrugt (1981) shows in Collateralen (Collaterals) three works about domestic violence.

The works were triggered by the idea of economists about the financial loss to the GDP by domestic violence.

She reacts especially to the cold-bloodedness of the economists’ findings.

They have become intriguing sculptures with the fallen bodies flat and almost eradicated on the floor and the tension of the textile threads.

There are also some small works about meetings she had during a visit to Iran.

They seem to ‘re-humanise’ the show more or less.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Sara Vrugt and Heden, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #35

Façade built in 1903 for 19th century stables with apartments, Casuariestraat.

A municipal monument, this is one of the least known and best preserved gems of Jugendstil design in town, not spoiled by a tasteless shop front or by revolting signs.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

International Silence, Mute; Heden, The Hague

You could say art has become the platform of spectacle these days, both in itself as a way of expression and in the idea of Guy Debord.

Therefore it is an inspiring idea that International Silence (Twan Janssen and Johannes Verwoerd) has shrunk back our daily bombardment of pictures and noise to some colourless light and shapes and the names of songs on playlists without hearing them and without forced connotations.

International Silence presents its installation Mute in Heden.

In it the almost sterile but compelling role of 3D printing is remarkable.

Every impulse is muted almost by itself.

As such Mute is a very refreshing and reflective installation and it is good Heden has given it a platform.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to International Silence and Heden, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Landscape Watchers; Nouvelles Images, The Hague

Jan van der Pol

After the sad loss of Erik Bos last winter Nouvelles Images gallery has a new manager.

Jan van der Pol

Marie Jeanne de Rooij has the ambitious task to give both continuity and new impulses to this oldest of Dutch galleries.

Jan van der Pol

Her first exhibition shows works by four artists.

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

It is remarkable that she didn’t choose to organize a big group show to close the ranks.

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

She clearly chose to close the ranks more aesthetically and substantively.

Auke de Vries

Her experience with big spaces obviously helped her in this big gallery, making one big show loosely based on one idea: landscape.

Jan van der Pol

Jan van der Pol

Jan van der Pol

Jan van der Pol

Jan van der Pol

Jan van der Pol (1949), combining in his paintings landscapes-as-found-footage from different sources, gives an idea of present day painted reality.

Jan van der Pol

Jan van der Pol

There are some fine drawings by Van der Pol on show as well.

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

L.J.A.D. Creyghton (1954) photographed landscapes of the Western Front of World War I, roughly from the northern Ardennes to the southern Vosges.

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

He also photographed ‘souvenirs’ from these places.

Awoiska van der Molen

Using photography as a more or less spiritual medium his works connect well with works by invited artist Awoiska van der Molen (1972) who internalises landscapes with this still more or less miraculous medium.

Auke de Vries

Auke de Vries

The few small works by Auke de Vries (1937), one of the doyens of the gallery (who has a big exhibition in Museum Beelden aan Zee at the moment), show sculpture as part of an invisible landscape.

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

Jan van der Pol

L.J.A.D. Creyghton

Jan van der Pol

As a whole this fine and strongly reflective show underscores the space – or the different spaces – of the gallery itself.

Awoiska van der Molen

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to the artists and Galerie Nouvelles Images, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Saskia Tannemaat, Forgiven!; Twelve twelve gallery, The Hague

Forgiven! is the title of Saskia Tannemaat’s present show at Twelve twelve gallery.

It sounds like a word of relief, but to whom?

Are the visitors forgiven, the potential buyers, or the people in Tannemaat’s paintings and drawings?

As Tannemaat shows in her works, guilt is often used as a power tool, ruling those who are being used to whitewash the shame of society.

She shows this as a kind of theatre, sometimes as a masquerade, the expression varying from deep tenderness to violent expressionism, from a nouvelle vague movie to a masked ball.

However, the real power of the show is that there is a lot in between those differences.

The presentation is very good, giving you the idea that the works lost none of their spontaneity in between the studio and the gallery.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Saskia Tannemaat and Twelve twelve gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #34

L’Homme (Man),

by Lon Pennock (1945),

made and placed in 1973,

Florence Nightingaleweg near Leyweg,

next to the then brandnew and modernist Leyenburg Hospital,

it still stands shiny and moving as a monument for its time and an inspiration to the present.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters