Façades of The Hague #53

Building Molenstraat corner Oude Molstraat.

Façade probably (re)built first quarter of the 20th century.

The part in Oude Molstraat contains the popular pub and restaurant de Oude Mol.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #51

In December 2015 the permanent International Criminal Court was opened.

It was designed by Danish bureau Schmidt Hammer Lassen architects.

It should reflect both power and trust, transparency and fortification of law and democracy.

It was built on the premises of a former army barracks on the edge of the sand dunes along the coast.

That makes the mighty six towering blocks a marker in the landscape.

Coming from the coast it can be seen emerging from the dunes.

Its ecological footprint is said to be as small as possible.

In spite of its colossal dimensions it also has quite some elegance in its outer design (i haven’t yet seen its interior).

It is situated in the triangle Van Alkemadelaan, Maurits Kiekpad and Oude Waalsdorperweg where it has its main entrance.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #50

Building with apartments and shops, Valeriusstraat corner Lübeckstraat, built in the 1950s to fill in the gap of the wasteland created by the German WWII Atlantic Wall.

Clearly the building is in post-WWII modernist style, even so it has two so-called gable stones (or wall stones) in its side façade in Lübeckstraat.

Traditionally gable stones contain some text or a relief explaining something about the owner or the history of the building.

In this case they show a lady, sitting in between two flowers while playing  a kind of harp. Both concrete gable stones are the same.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Picture 1 taken in March 2016, pictures 2,3 and 4 taken in May 2016, picture 5 taken in March 2017.

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #49

Façade with turrets, Laan van Meerdervoort, built probably around 1905 in the characteristic decorative style of the period. The right-hand turret has been restored in a somewhat cheapish way. The two parts of the building have clearly (had) different owners, as the differences in the renovations show.

In the right-hand part a Jewish merchant and his family (wife and one son) lived until 1942, when they tried to flee to Switzerland but were caught by the Nazi’s in France and were murdered in Auschwitz.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #47

Façade of a building with a shop on the ground floor, Wagenstraat.

Gable probably late 19th century or around 1900.

Shop front was lowered later on in the 20th century with the row of twelve small windows, leaving the concrete above it naked.

Today it houses the famous Jazz Center store.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #46

Façade of a building with no entrance to the street, Casuariestraat, built probably around 1900, maybe even later. I’m not sure about the original purpose of the building (somebody is?), however, the middle window once was a grand entrance of something.

At the moment there are studios in it of the Royal  Academy of Art (Koninklijke Academie van Beeldende Kunsten – KABK), and the building may well have been meant to contain studios right from the beginning, either for the KABK or for another institution in the neighbourhood.

In the 1970s and 80s it had a kind of clerestory on top which has vanished since.

As they used to be sculptor students’ studios, according to the artists duo Topp & Dubio, it once had a graffiti saying “FUCK BEELDHOUWERS” (“FUCK SCULPTORS”).

To make an homage to that graffiti the duo wrote a new one with the same text, which they were ordered by the police to remove, which they did. However, traces of the graffiti can still be seen.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters