Studio visit: Jan Hoogervorst

Jan Hoogervorst 01

Last week I visited Jan Hoogervorst’s studio, where he has a modest presentation of works he made recently.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

A studio presentation is usually less photogenic than a gallery presentation, so my camera had a bit of a bad time, but I was amazed by what I saw nevertheless.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Central to Hoogervorst’s present work is the idea that the human brain and will, let alone our other body functions, are not as free as we would like them to be.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As a consequence our choices and ideas are not as free as we pretend.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In his i-pad paintings, pencil drawings and woodcuts Hoogervorst is trying to make a kind of scans of that mechanism of un-freedom.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Technically they also seem to be inspired by that idea.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Hoogervorst uses all his technical skills as a draughtsman and graphic artist to improvise visions that could be revealing.

Jan Hoogervorst 09
Jan Hoogervorst 10

One might easily think the results would be sarcastic, but I don’t think they are, as Hoogervorst is obviously trying to steer clear of any moralizing.

Jan Hoogervorst 11

The ideas become even more intricate in his interior drawings, where the human body reacts to its environment.

Jan Hoogervorst 12

These works are multi-interpretable as you may see the perception of the protagonists of the space around them and the interpretation of the artist, as well as your own interpretation.

Jan Hoogervorst, i-pad painting, print

Jan Hoogervorst, i-pad painting, print

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Nathalie Duivenvoorden in Tromsø; A Gallery Named Sue, The Hague

AGNS 01 Nathalie Duivenvoorden

A Gallery Named Sue shows Nathalie Duivenvoorden’s drawings inspired by her stay in Norway.

AGNS 02 Nathalie Duivenvoorden
AGNS 03 Nathalie Duivenvoorden

As she made them after pictures she took in the country with a non-professional camera, the remembrances have had their filters already.

AGNS 04 Nathalie Duivenvoorden
AGNS 05 Nathalie Duivenvoorden
AGNS 06 Nathalie Duivenvoorden

Duivenvoorden’s way of drawing recreates a kind of remembrance in which especially the light and dark play an almost magical role.

AGNS 07 Nathalie Duivenvoorden
AGNS 08 Nathalie Duivenvoorden

With her colour pencils the dark becomes glowing, as the blue does.

AGNS 09 Nathalie Duivenvoorden
AGNS 10 Nathalie Duivenvoorden

The works are still on show this weekend (i was a bit late visiting the exhibition) so hurry to go and see them, some of them are real gems!

AGNS 11 Nathalie Duivenvoorden
AGNS 12 Nathalie Duivenvoorden

Duivenvoorden’s wintery Nordic landscapes are well presented in the gallery, under the guard of Ignace Cami’s Flemish lion.

AGNS 13 Ignace Cami
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Marius Lut at Stroom, The Hague

Marius Lut 01

Marius Lut 02

In Stroom’s sympathetic Ondertussen (In the mean time) series Marius Lut shows three works that will be part of an artist’s book, called Form no Form/The Black Series

Marius Lut 03

due to be published. Abstraction and minimalisation or reduction of shape
and redefining its structure and outlook are Lut’s trade. Black, dimness, gloss,

Marius Lut 04

reflection, etc are all part of the game. It makes these particular works very difficult to photograph. But altogether it also shows that you have to see art in real. There

Marius Lut 05

is very little time left to do so (only this weekend) as I was very late visiting this exhibition. Do take a look, if you can. It made me all the more eager to see the book.

Marius Lut 06
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Show More, Bruno Listopad & Nicola Knezevic at Stroom, The Hague

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 01

Boredom can be a good source of creativity.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 02

To the viewer however, boredom is killing.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 03

Bruno Listopad’s and Nicola Knezevic’ show at Stroom pretends a lot but shows actually not much more than utter boredom.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 04

On the walls are moving empty spaces, sometimes with art like objects. They are the very best part of the show.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 05

There are also projections of YouTube movies made by amateurs. “These individuals take charge of their online representation by transforming themselves into subject-objects that either comply with or challenge established norms of behaviour,” according to Stroom.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 06

Well, anything and everything is worth a look in this world, but these YouTube videos take a lot of time and tell you almost nothing, like their description.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 07

In the basement are an unclear object and

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 08

some unreadable stuff on the floor.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 09

The show is appropriately called Show More.

Bruno Listopad, Nicola Knezevic 10
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Nies Vooijs at Heden art centre, The Hague

Nies Vooijs 01
Nies Vooijs 02

To write a review for the Villa La Repubblica blog (read the full article here – in Dutch, and see some more pictures) about Nies Vooijs’ exhibition,

Nies Vooijs 03
Nies Vooijs 04

I visited Heden art centre where she presently has an exhibition at the centre’s gallery.

Nies Vooijs 05
Nies Vooijs 06
Nies Vooijs 07

Vooijs obtained the Heden Oeuvre Award last year for an oeuvre spanning some thirty five years.

Nies Vooijs 08
Nies Vooijs 09

The prize is given to artists who have reached an age of (some kind of) wisdom and have created an inspiring and consistent body of work throughout their careers in The Hague.

Nies Vooijs 10
Nies Vooijs 11

There is certainly no lack of consistency or of inspiration in Vooijs’ works.

Nies Vooijs 12
Nies Vooijs 13

In the exhibition she shows a few oils from the 1980’s and more recent works.

Nies Vooijs 14
Nies Vooijs 15

Her works are particularly difficult to describe. They are neither figurative nor abstract, neither narrative nor conceptualist.

Nies Vooijs 16
Nies Vooijs 17

It sounds like a terrible cliché, but they are just themselves.

Nies Vooijs 18
Nies Vooijs 19
Nies Vooijs 20

In the basement of the gallery is her big cash book with cuttings from newspapers and magazines and there are cuttings and small objects pinned to the wall as well. You could call it a room of inspiration.

Nies Vooijs 21
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus

Colour unleashed; Modern art in the Low Countries 1885-1914. Gemeentemuseum, The Hague

Claude Monet, 1867

Claude Monet, 1867

Because of renovations in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, part of its collection is travelling around. That was a good opportunity for the Gemeentemuseum to combine some of these works with a few other loans and with paintings of its own collection of the period 1885-1914.

Claude Monet, 1862

Claude Monet, 1867

The exhibition Colour Unleashed aims to show the influence of French impressionist and postimpressionist painting on Belgian and Dutch painters in the way of using bright colours. It results in a very colourful show indeed, starting with some founding fathers of modernism like Monet,

Paul Cézanne

Paul Cézanne

Vincent van Gogh, 1890

Vincent van Gogh, 1890

artistic patriarchs like Cézanne and Van Gogh and their artistic sons like

Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse

Henri Matisse

Kees van Dongen, 1903

Kees van Dongen, 1903

Kees van Dongen, 1903

Kees van Dongen, 1903

Matisse and Van Dongen (clearly this is one of the less colourful paintings).

Piet Mondrian, 1909

Piet Mondrian, 1909

A restoration project has been linked to the exhibition and so this Mondrian has been cleaned and looks very fresh now.

James Ensor, 1882

James Ensor, 1882

This both intimate and monumental scene by the young James Ensor is present as well, as is

Théo van Rysselberghe, 1891

Théo van Rysselberghe, 1891

Théo van Rysselberghe, 1891

Théo van Rysselberghe, 1891

one of my favourites, this portrait by Van Rysselberghe.

James Ensor, 1890

James Ensor, 1890

James Ensor, 1890

James Ensor, 1890

James Ensor, 1890

James Ensor, 1890

Another great favourite from Antwerp is of course this Ensor, which is exhibited

Willem Paerels, 1909

Willem Paerels, 1909

Willem Paerels, 1909

Willem Paerels, 1909

Willem Paerels, 1909

Willem Paerels, 1909

in the same room as this much lesser known but very interesting work by Paerels.

Jan Sluijters, 1907

Jan Sluijters, 1907

Jan Sluijters, 1907

Jan Sluijters, 1907

Jan Sluijters, 1907

Jan Sluijters, 1907

This amazingly brilliant Sluijters has been cleaned and restored too.

Jacoba van Heemskerck, 1908/10

Jacoba van Heemskerck, 1908/10

Jacoba van Heemskerck, 1908/10

Jacoba van Heemskerck, 1908/10

Van Heemskerck is one of the very few female artists in the exhibition.

Piet Mondrian, 1907

Piet Mondrian, 1907

Of course the Gemeentemuseum’s own Red Cloud by Mondrian can’t be absent.

Rik Wouters, 1913

Rik Wouters, 1913

Rik Wouters, 1912

Rik Wouters, 1912

Rik Wouters, 1912

Rik Wouters, 1912

Rik Wouters

Rik Wouters

Great and nice surprise is that one room is completely dedicated to one of the greatest Flemish painters of the period: Rik Wouters.

Rik Wouters, 1915

Rik Wouters, 1915

There are two more paintings by Wouters in the next room, one of them is this self portrait.

Else Berg, 1911/12

Else Berg, 1911/12

But the surprises may also be small like this landscape by Berg.

Leo Gestel, 1914

Leo Gestel, 1914

There are more paintings by Gestel on show, this is one of them.

Jan Sluijters, 1913

Jan Sluijters, 1913

In the same room is this somewhat Kandinskyesque Sluijters.

Berend Zweers, 1905/10

Berend Zweers, 1905/10

To complete the story there is a mixture of paintings and other items on show in the cabinets. Like this rare autochrome original from the early history of colour photography, or

CU 34 Georges Lemmen

this letter of Georges Lemmen to Jan Toorop.

Emile Claus, 1905

Emile Claus, 1905

There are, amongst many other different items, this strangely romantic painting,

Floris Verster, 1907

Floris Verster, 1907

this late impressionist one,

Johan Thorn Prikker, 1905

Johan Thorn Prikker, 1905

this exquisite chalk drawing,

Jan Toorop, 1908

Jan Toorop, 1908

this small panel and

CU 39

this reminder of how the colourful modernist dream changed into Europe’s first horrible trauma of the new age. Let’s hope it is not a bad omen in this otherwise wonderful autumn show.

T.A.C. Colenbrander, 1923

T.A.C. Colenbrander, 1923

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Lara Almarcegui, De Ateliers/Debut Series; Gemeentemuseum, The Hague

GM01 Lara Almarcegui

Lara Almarcegui shows two works in the De Ateliers/Debut Series at the Gemeentemuseum, The Hague.

GM02 Lara Almarcegui

One is a short video called Buried House, where

GM03 Lara Almarcegui

a house is being torn down and

GM04 Lara Almarcegui

the rubble is buried in the ground and covered with soil.

GM05 Lara Almarcegui

Dust to dust, so to say.

GM06 Lara Almarcegui

The video is well done, but that’s really all it is.

GM07 Lara Almarcegui

The other project is a list of materials used to build the Gemeentemuseum. If you are interested in numbers, it will make your day.

GM08

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Art The Hague 2015; Fokker Terminal, The Hague

ATH15 01

Art fairs are usually not the places for great artistic surprises. If you regularly visit galleries, an art fair acts as a sum of what you have seen before.

Erik Buijs

Erik Buijs

Still art fairs are different in atmosphere and quality and Art The Hague positively seems to have found some stability in both. Indeed there are galleries who show a mixture of artists whose works they have or will have on offer currently, which is generally what art fairs are good for.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

For instance Vonkel gallery of The Hague presents some interesting works by some of their very different young artists like Inge Aanstoot,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Maarten van Soest and

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
ATH15 07 Romy Muijrers

Romy Muijrers who graduated from the Royal Academy of The Hague only this year.

ATH15 08 Eelke van Willegen

Helder gallery shows amongst others these attractive objects made by Eelke van Willegen specially for the five year anniversary of the gallery this fall.

ATH15 09 Nies Vooijs
ATH15 10 Nies Vooijs

Heden will open a solo exhibition of works by rarely exhibiting Nies Vooijs this Friday and already shows some works here at the fair.

ATH15 11 Joost van den Toorn

Nouvelles Images presents this sculpture by Joost van den Toorn amongst many others.

ATH15 12 Geert Baas
ATH15 13 Geert Baas

Ramakers gallery has some nice works on show by Geert Baas and

ATH15 14 Joncquil
ATH15 15 Joncquil

by Joncquil.

ATH15 16 Thomas Rameckers
ATH15 17 Thomas Rameckers

Kers Gallery from Amsterdam presents amongst others these fine paintings by Thomas Rameckers.

ATH15 18 Summer Matthews

The Rotterdam Aboriginal Art Gallery shows some interesting works by Australian aboriginal artists Summer Matthews and

ATH15 19 James Budiyalil

by James Budiyalil.

ATH15 20 Stefan Gross

Some galleries just present virtually the same kind of things as last year.

ATH15 21 Stefan Gross

These are two of last year’s pictures of works by Stefan Gross at Bob Smit’s gallery from Rotterdam, but the same pictures could have been taken this year.

ATH15 22 Aart Houtman
ATH15 23 Aart Houtman

Some galleries organize a special event, like a solo presentation for an artist. For example Het Bouwhuis gallery from Deventer made a small solo show for painter Aart Houtman. The room is very small and has more or less turned into a kind of chapel with Houtman’s work.

ATH15 24 Simon Schrikker

Livingstone gallery of The Hague presents a new book about painter Simon Schrikker who currently has a show at the gallery, about which i reported here.

ATH15 25 Simon Schrikker, Kees Koomen

Here is Schrikker in conversation with my blogging colleague Kees Koomen.

ATH15 26 A Print Factory
ATH15 27 A Print Factory

A Gallery Named Sue, always good for something exceptional, has a very special event with A Print Factory, where you can choose your print and buy it for just less than 100 Euros.

ATH15 28

The best features of Art The Hague however are usually in the offices next to the hangar. On the second floor some galleries show some extra works of their artists,

ATH15 29 Simon Schrikker

like Livingstone gallery with Simon Schrikker,

ATH15 30 Alex de Witte

Helder with Alex de Witte amongst others,

ATH15 31 Stefan Gross

(and where did we see this before?), and

ATH15 32 Romy Muijrers

Vonkel with Romy Muijrers and

ATH15 33 Wim Warrink

Wim Warrink amongst others.

ATH15 34 Stig Steijner
ATH15 35 Stig Steijner

On the ground floor Kers gallery gives a very strong performance of some young artists with amongst many: Stig Steijner,

ATH15 36 Thijs Linssen
ATH15 37 Thijs Linssen

Thijs Linssen and

ATH15 38 Mathieu Klomp
ATH15 39 Mathieu Klomp
ATH15 40 Mathieu Klomp
ATH15 41 Mathieu Klomp
ATH15 42 Mathieu Klomp
ATH15 43 Mathieu Klomp
ATH15 44 Mathieu Klomp

Mathieu Klomp who imitates with plastic the bombastic outlook of monumental sculpture with gestures of daily life.

ATH15 45
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters