Jeroen Blok, It’s no use going back to tomorrow; Twelve twelve gallery, The Hague

Artists deal with reality and they add to it.

They have to, in spite of what some people may think.

Reality is the artist’s bread and butter and Jeroen Blok (1976), who is presently showing his work in Twelve twelve gallery, seems to acknowledge that.

He approaches it with techniques as different as painting, photography and collage.

He uses more layers in his works, either to add to reality or to peel it.

In some of his works you may think of surrealism.

But then, isn’t surrealism an extra reality that is both additive and reflective?

Whatever, i think Jeroen Blok’s work is both.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Jeroen Blok and Twelve twelve gallery, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

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Anna Fafaliou, The things I own own me; Twelve twelve Gallery, The Hague

The title of the exhibition could be a warning to the potential buyers of the works of Anna Fafaliou (1987) presently on show at Twelve twelve Gallery.

In a way her works are a kind of hide-and-seek.

Fafaliou has banned colour and black from her works.

White, mirrors, transparency, structure or the lack of it, light and gloss remain.

Her works create an inviting emptiness that may remind you of Zero.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Anna Fafaliou and Twelve twelve Gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Gert Scheerlinck, Objects of disguise; Twelve twelve gallery, The Hague

At the moment Belgian artist Gert Scheerlinck has an exhibition at Twelve twelve gallery.

I stress the fact that Scheerlinck is a Belgian artist as Belgian artists seem to have a special feeling for the absurd.

The Dutch usually tend to perceive absurdity as an abrupt kind of humour, but for Belgians absurdity has to do with the human condition itself.

They use absurdism both as an escape from and a confrontation with the human condition.

Scheerlinck certainly does so with his objects and materials taken from everyday life.

Most objects are based on ideas, but Scheerlinck takes the other way round: his objects become ideas again.

His objects and installations, sometimes tiny and usually hardly photographable, are on the verge to become ideas while leaving the viewer puzzled.

And that is where absurdity takes its chance.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Gert Scheerlinck and Twelve twelve Gallery, Den Haag.

 

Bertus Pieters

Marin de Jong, Chronicle for the Millions; Twelve twelve Gallery, The Hague

Twelve twelve Gallery presently shows latest works by Marin de Jong (1976).

Working in our post-postmodern age De Jong is trying to find answers to the fast and disturbing de-rationalisation of society we are experiencing these days.

More than before people seem to be prepared to believe in irrational plots, nonsensical scare mongering and the vilification of any intelligence, including the arts.

De Jong reacts by covering up some of his works, literally closing them down for the expecting gaze, but he does so with humour.

As we have learnt from Christo, covering up doesn’t just hide the covered object, it also creates a new object.

De Jong shows how art will move on in spite of everything, like a fungus that doesn’t stop growing and multiplying.

Far from going underground, his works manifest themselves with character in spite of their subjects being internalised.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Marin de Jong and Twelve twelve Gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Sam Lock, Presence; Twelve twelve gallery, The Hague

Sam Lock (1973) shows works on paper in Twelve twelve gallery.

For a painter who works in structures and layers, using water based media, charcoal, chalk etc on paper is a special challenge.

Every movement of the hand and the mind can be traced, which some may describe as ‘more spontaneous’.

But, as Lock shows, there is nothing more or less spontaneous in working on paper.

Lock’s way of working may remind you of Michelangelo’s idea that the shape of a sculpture only needed to be liberated from the marble.

Lock gives you the idea that the concept of the drawing  was already there in the paper, it just needed to be liberated, while in fact you see a co-operation between mind and material.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of the photographs courtesy to Sam Lock and Twelve twelve gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Wycliffe Mundopa, Tongogara; Twelve twelve Gallery, The Hague

I visited Twelve twelve Gallery to write an article about Wycliffe Mundopa’s (1987) solo show for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the article (in Dutch).

The article is about the painting Inheritance, shown here with some details.

I leave you with the pictures here, as i have commented already extensively in VLR, with the recommendation to go and take a look for yourself.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Wycliffe Mundopa and Twelve twelve Gallery, Den Haag.

 

Bertus Pieters

Rutger van der Tas, Een ode aan de verwarde man (An Ode to the Disturbed Man); Twelve twelve gallery, The Hague

In a remarkable turn in his work, Rutger van der Tas (1980), a painter, is now reaching for three-dimensionality.

However, his works are still paintings as can be seen in his present show at Twelve Twelve gallery.

As the title of the show indicates, his work is all about disturbance as life is often – even for the greatest possible mutton head – a painful business.

Figures are deconstructed and reconstructed in colours that indicate both the pain and force of life, and so do the jigsaw puzzle-like cuts in the works which show that nothing is stable in life.

Watching the three-dimensional works, i was just wandering how they would look like if they were life sized, as they look quite monumental.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Rutger van der Tas and Twelve Twelve gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Saskia Tannemaat, Forgiven!; Twelve twelve gallery, The Hague

Forgiven! is the title of Saskia Tannemaat’s present show at Twelve twelve gallery.

It sounds like a word of relief, but to whom?

Are the visitors forgiven, the potential buyers, or the people in Tannemaat’s paintings and drawings?

As Tannemaat shows in her works, guilt is often used as a power tool, ruling those who are being used to whitewash the shame of society.

She shows this as a kind of theatre, sometimes as a masquerade, the expression varying from deep tenderness to violent expressionism, from a nouvelle vague movie to a masked ball.

However, the real power of the show is that there is a lot in between those differences.

The presentation is very good, giving you the idea that the works lost none of their spontaneity in between the studio and the gallery.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Saskia Tannemaat and Twelve twelve gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters