Anne Forest: Lineage; Heden, The Hague

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When Anne Forest graduated from the Royal Academy in The Hague i can’t say I was exceptionally impressed by her work. It looked too much like a mannerism to me, but during the last few years she has matured considerably.

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Now she is an artist who is immediately recognizable indeed, but her style is also manoeuvrable. It tries to match any material.

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Inspired by the Russian Orthodox icons she grew up with, her main subject is the portrait. Every one of these portraits is a stylish clash between icon-like formalism and expression of character.

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With every new portrait she strikes a new balance between material, form, line, colour and expression. Every portrait creates its own formalism. At present her work is on show at Heden. Make sure to go and see it!

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[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Content of pictures courtesy to Anne Forest and Heden.

 

Bertus Pieters

Drawing Front (and back); Quartair, The Hague

Astrid Nobel, 7. 29/32

Astrid Nobel, 7. 29/32

Astrid Nobel, 7

Astrid Nobel, 7

I’m afraid you are too late to visit the show Drawing Front (and back) at Quartair, which is a pity as it was quite an interesting one. Twenty-five artists gave a small personal artistic biography in drawings, ideally showing a children’s drawing, one from their teens and some more from a later age.

Sarah Pape García, 7

Sarah Pape García, 7

Sarah Pape García, 22

Sarah Pape García, 22

The results were, apart from endearing, sometimes stunning. Although the show is over I thought it was interesting enough to show some pictures for the record.

Femke Bakker, 9

Femke Bakker, 9

Femke Bakker, 27

Femke Bakker, 27

Taking presentable pictures of everything was not possible and I’m sorry to say I have no footage of the works by Justin Bennett and Rens Krikhaar because of much too irritating reflections in the glass (Sorry gentlemen, but it was a pleasure seeing them anyway!). The numbers behind the names under the pictures refer to the age of the artists at the moment of drawing.

Babette Wagenvoort

Babette Wagenvoort

Babette Wagenvoort, 43

Babette Wagenvoort, 43

Babette Wagenvoort, 33

Babette Wagenvoort, 33

Babette Wagenvoort, 3

Babette Wagenvoort, 3

Babette Wagenvoort, 15

Babette Wagenvoort, 15

Anne Forest, 22

Anne Forest, 32

Anne Forest, 8

Anne Forest, 8

Anne Forest, 22

Anne Forest, 22

Paul van der Eerden, 38

Paul van der Eerden, 38

Paul van der Eerden, 61

Paul van der Eerden, 61

Johan Gustavsson, 37

Johan Gustavsson, 37

Johan Gustavsson, 30

Johan Gustavsson, 30

Wieske Wester, 30

Wieske Wester, 30

Erik Jan Ligtvoet, 17

Erik Jan Ligtvoet, 17

Erik Jan Ligtvoet

Erik Jan Ligtvoet

Cybil Scott, 5

Cybil Scott, 5

Cybil Scott, 26

Cybil Scott, 26

Melissa Cruz García, 8

Melissa Cruz García, 8

Melissa Cruz García, 26

Melissa Cruz García, 26

Melissa Cruz García, 36

Melissa Cruz García, 36

Michael Karr, 12

Michael Karr, 12

Michael Karr, 30

Michael Karr, 30

Michael Karr, 20

Michael Karr, 20

Tanja Smit, 48

Tanja Smit, 48

Tanja Smit, 30

Tanja Smit, 30

Tanja Smit

Tanja Smit

 Johan van Oord, 34

Johan van Oord, 34

Johan van Oord, 8

Johan van Oord, 8

Wietske Heldens

Wieteke Heldens

Wietske Heldens, 3

Wieteke Heldens, 3

Channa Boon, 48

Channa Boon, 48

Channa Boon, 28

Channa Boon, 28

Lieke Peeters, 20

Lieke Peeters, 20

Lieke Peeters, 10

Lieke Peeters, 10

Jorn van Leeuwen, 10

Jorn van Leeuwen, 10

Thom Vink, 42

Thom Vink, 42

Marjolijn van der Meij, 15

Marjolijn van der Meij, 15

Marjolijn van der Meij, 45

Marjolijn van der Meij, 45

Ronald Cornelissen, 28

Ronald Cornelissen, 28

Nina Roos, 5

Nina Roos, 5

Nina Roos, 28

Nina Roos, 28

Stefanie Scholte, 7

Stefanie Scholte, 7

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

 

Bertus Pieters

Art The Hague, Fokker Terminal, The Hague

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Art The Hague is quite a small fair but it takes some time to see it all. There is a kind of limbo before you enter the real art fair,

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which gives you the idea that things are not really important in that vestibule. The Hague Historical Museum shows some pictures of its sympathetic project Den Haag, Stad van aankomst (The Hague, City of Arrival) by Conny Luhulima and Geert van Kesteren, while

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WTC-Gallery shows some expressive postmodernity to fit modern suburbia, with amongst others this diorama by Demiak. And further on?

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Well, they probably forgot to put this sculpture by Joachim De Block in its right place and left it in limbo to be ignored by the visitors. And on entering the great hall

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you might think you entered a luxury poster shop, but

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do turn left to Seasons Gallery to take a look at Gerard Verdijk’s paintings. Verdijk (1934-2005) was one of the best painters in The Hague.

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Work by Lauren Hillebrandt at With Tsjalling, playing with colour, shape and meaning.

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Gallery Project 0.2 shows Denis Rouvre who always uses the same clair-obscure, presented by the gallery in an aesthetic, stark and clean way. A modern way of having trophies on your wall. But

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why do i think Rouvre’s work is slick and this drawing by Arike Gill (at Vonkel Gallery) isn’t?

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Talking about slick photography (and there is quite a lot on show), you can’t say Merijn Koelink’s pictures are slick. He concentrated on the use of LED in public places at night. Colour, light and dark tell a story here with more aspects. Koelink is a fresh graduate of the The Hague Royal Academy (at A Gallery Named Sue).

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Helder Gallery shows, amongst others, sculptures by Willem Speekenbrink and paintings by Jakob de Jonge who will both have an exhibition at the gallery soon.

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This year some Belgian galleries are represented at the fair. Amongst others Eastmen Gallery with works by Kamagurka and

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by Gommaar Gilliams, a painter who isn’t very well known in this country.

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Nouvelles Images gallery shows, amongst others, geometric abstract works by Cor van Dijk (very fine sculpture) and

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Ditty Ketting (painting).

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Some galleries give special attention to just one or two artists. Others who don’t, have sometimes difficulties in showing where their priorities are, like Van Hoof Gallery (is it just aesthetics? funny but silent pets?),

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Chiefs and Spirits (art from Africa? art from elsewhere? and why exactly this choice?)

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or Het Bouwhuis (the aesthetics of nature? or aesthetics based on nature?).

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Compared to these Bob Smit Gallery has no qualms showing what it stands for, as these works by Stefan Gross show.

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At Mirta Demare gallery Sandro Setola silently steals the show, while

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in the next booth Buro Rotterdam has a small but very fine solo presentation of works by Olaf Mooij who gave cars a different, more organic life (and who also made the sculpture you can see on the very first picture of this posting).

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Next year herman de vries wil represent the Netherlands at the Venice Biennial and as such he has been given a booth of his own.

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That you can perfectly well show quite a few different artists in one booth without losing your identity as a gallery is shown by Ramakers gallery

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and Heden, the place in The Hague where you can borrow art. Heden also

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shows work by Anne Forest who will have an exhibition there soon.

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Livingstone gallery pays some extra attention to small but very fine works by Jan Wattjes, while

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Dom’Arte shows amongst others works by Marc Mulders and

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Han Klinkhamer.

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But the best prominent and defining features of Art The Hague are the informal solo presentations, away from the egalitarian dictatorship of the white cube.

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On the ground floor is a presentation of works by sculptors who graduated from Belgian Academies this year. They all exhibit interesting work. I’ll give an impression here without comments: Jean-Loup Leclerq,

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Marjorie Kapelusz,

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Clara Gallet,

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Jeroen Van der Fraenen,

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Joachim De Block and

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Ruben Podevyn.

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On the second floor there are some special presentations by galleries,

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again without much comment: Livingstone shows Simon Schrikker’s marvellous Pulpo series together with the stop motion video he made with it;

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Bob Smit Gallery shows that being over the top says more about art and society than just being slick,

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as shown here by Pieter W. Postma;

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Helder gallery has an impressive combination of works by Willem Speekenbrink (sculpture),

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Jochem Rotteveel (paintings with duct tape) and

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Roland Sohier (drawings); and

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Ramakers gallery shows Joncquil’s fine series 60 Ways to Hold a Rope.

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Although the exhibition has no real surprises, this year’s edition is stronger than last year’s,

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but it could be much stronger.

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(Click on the pictures to enlarge)

Bertus Pieters