Concepts of Time; National Archaeology Museum, Hooglandse Kerkgracht, LUMC, Leiden

Juliaan Andeweg

This year’s Beelden in Leiden (Sculptures in Leiden) summer show is called Concepts of Time as the venerable National Archaeological Museum (Rijksmuseum van Oudheden) in the city is celebrating its two hundred years anniversary.

Juliaan Andeweg

Part of the exhibition is on show in the museum and that is where i started my own visit.

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg (1986) surely was lucky being able to install his work in the Museum’s Egyptian temple.

Juliaan Andeweg

Works by other artists are on show in a separate hall.

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos (1980) made a sculpture specially for the exhibition in his by now well known vocabulary full of inner conflict and search for harmony.

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets (1983) undeniably has a place in a show in the Archaeological Museum full of mythology.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster (1987) is also an artist that springs to mind when thinking about archaeology and time.

Emma van der Put

Emma van der Put

Emma van der Put’s (1988) video is about sculpture and the instability of vision.

Bastienne Kramer

Bastienne Kramer (1961) has a wall for a series of small objects based on the feminine in sculpture from the early days of humanity up to the present.

Bastienne Kramer

There are also two big sculptures by her on show.

Daniëlle van Ark

Daniëlle van Ark (1974) gives a photographic reinterpretation of Michelangelo’s David’s hand.

Bastienne Kramer

Bastienne Kramer

Jasper Hagenaar

Painter Jasper Hagenaar (1977) paints his own self imagined mythologies.

Jasper Hagenaar

The exhibition in the museum is modest but diverse and may give the visitor to the museum some interesting afterthoughts about the present as part of history and archaeology.

Damian Kapojos

Beelden in Leiden’s home base is Hooglandse Kerkgracht, a closed canal turned into an intimate, leafy avenue.

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

At the north end of the canal the show starts with another, bigger work by Kapojos, like the one in the museum looking like a complete cosmos elegantly kept in balance.

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yaïr Callender (1987) is still in his mood of floating, sleeping, dreaming and the world of mythology and mystique it creates.

Jonathan van Doornum

Jonathan van Doornum

One of the more severe works (but uncertain about the will of a stern god) is by Jonathan van Doornum (1987).

Rein Verhoef

Rein Verhoef

Rein Verhoef

There is a certain strictness in this work by Rein Verhoef (1989) too, but of quite a different kind; it looks quite self-evident and the care with which it is made, makes it almost sensual.

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

In her fountain-like work Smeets tries to find yet another basic narrative language.

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels (1983) made a batman as a sentinel, his ears vaguely reminiscing the guarding Anubis’ ears.

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen (1987) apparently used Indo-Pacific carving as the base for two poles painted completely white, standing to wait for ancestors that still have to be born.

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

In Andeweg’s installation i missed the promised “bottle with imitation water,” but it is all the more intriguing.

Lillian Vlaun

Lillian Vlaun (1993) quasi-reconstructed a vase in materials that are not what they seem to be.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Koster has an ornamented circle or lid in front of the magnificent gothic facade of the north transept of the 15th century Hooglandse Kerk; the scarab on the circle being a reminder of time.

Lillian Vlaun

The Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC) is the third venue for Concepts of Time.

Alexandra Hunts & Anna Fijnstein

The place, although sympathetic, is not photography friendly, so here is a choice of the more or less photographable works.

Alexandra Hunts & Anna Fijnstein

Alexandra Hunts (1990) and Anna Frijstein (1991) made a number of variations on the Willendorf Venus.

Sander van Noort

Sander van Noort (1986), originally a painter, now also makes sculptures based on classical sculpture.

Jonathan van Doornum

Jasper Hagenaar

Sander van Noort

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Bas de Wit

There are also sculptures by Bas de Wit (1977) who seem to lead a life apart from reality.

Jasper Hagenaar

Bas de Wit

Daniëlle van Ark

Nynke Koster

Generally curator Sandrine van Noort (curator of the LUMC art collection) has made a very strong choice, avoiding easy sentimentalism and easy art that should appeal to different target audiences.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

There is a strong sense of history being part of the contemporary world, and there is place for mysticism, mythology and ideas about craftsmanship in present day art practice.

Nynke Koster

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Beelden in Leiden.

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #65

Apartment building Laan van Meerdervoort corner Waldeck-Pyrmontkade.

Designed by Jan Olthuis – an architect who was born in the mid 19th century and who has designed more buildings in The Hague, but about whom not much is known biographically – it was built in 1902/1903 in the very decorative Art Nouveau style.

With its flamboyant cinnamon coloured engineering bricks and its tiled tableaus in pastel colours it is a real landmark at the crossroads of the two avenues.

In the 1930s shops were built on the ground floor.

Olthuis was responsible for the design of at least some of the tableaus.

The tiles themselves were produced by the firm ‘Thooft and Labouchere in its famous factory De Porceleyne Fles (internationally nowadays known as ‘Royal Delft’) in Delft. (the Dutch Cultural Heritage Agency wrongly states that the tiles were made by the Rozenburg ceramics factory in The Hague).

The building is a state monument and was restored in the 1990s and recently.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Kim Hospers, Esse Est Percipi #whatever; Galerie Maurits van de Laar, The Hague

According to the British philosopher George Berkeley (1685-1735) to be is to be perceived.

In our age of digital mass exposure this may have detrimental consequences as to how we are perceived, and so, following Berkeley, how and who we are.

This smells already like the trend of the last few decades or so of identity thinking, its blurring, its history, its morality and its blah-blah.

However, Kim Hospers (1982) escapes these preoccupations, by concentrating on deliberate visible destruction of the individual identity as a practical joke by pranksters on the internet.

Usually meant to be seen by a circle of friends and acquaintances of the victim, these pictures of ridiculed sleeping beauties can be found as trash circling on the internet.

In fact the general viewer doesn’t know the pranked persons and as such they become alternative individuals, clogged by what could be seen as caricatures or superlatives of the human condition.

Hospers has drawn an enormous collection of faces based on these pictures of fooled identities.

A series of twelve dozen same-sized drawings on show at Maurits van de Laar’s gallery gives the impression of a mass gathering of zombie-like people, whose dreams may be as weird as their appearances.

There are also bigger portraits and some sculptures on show.

Altogether it makes for another spectacular and very fine show to end a very strong pre-summer season at Van de Laar’s gallery.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Kim Hospers and Galerie Maurits van de Laar, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Lucius Pax, Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Petra Knötschke; Kunsthaus Knötschke, The Hague

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

There are developing more small scale art spaces in The Hague these days, varying from shop windows and tiny galleries to living room pop-up exhibitions like this one in Petra Knötschke’s house.

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Lucius Pax

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Lucius Pax

Three artists are exhibiting in the two storeys of the house: Petra Knötschke herself, who shows objects, Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek with ceramic vases and Lucius Pax, paintings.

Petra Knötschke

Petra Knötschke

Lucius Pax

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Knötschke’s objects, made of wood, metal and other materials, look like un-mechanical mechanisms, improvisations that live by themselves.

Lucius Pax

Lucius Pax

Lucius Pax

Vismans’ vases may appear like ‘real’ vases but they may also develop into almost corporeal objects, both opened and closed.

Lucius Pax

Lucius Pax, Petra Knötschke

Petra Knötschke, Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Lucius Pax, always painting life as a thriller movie, shows some works based on German ‘Krimis’ (criminal tv-series) and German erotic movies.

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Lucius Pax

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Lucius Pax

Petra Knötschke

The whole show is well-arranged and is only open this weekend (23-24 June).

Lucius Pax

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists.

Bertus Pieters

Lula Valletta, Purgatorio; Hok gallery, The Hague

Hok Gallery (hok is Dutch for cage) is the newest and – with just eleven square metres walking space – also the smallest gallery in The Hague.

It opened its doors this month, and in bimonthly exhibitions it tries to connect with the underground pop culture.

As such – tiny as it is – it could become an interesting and again diversifying addition to art life in The Hague.

Its first exhibition shows collages by Lula Valletta.

In these collages, many of them based on the famous Ghent Altarpiece, she seems to hark back to Dada and German art of the Interwar period.

The rediscovery of the less “stable” art movements of the 20th century seems to become more prominent in European art these day.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Lula Valletta and Hok Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #64

Blocks of social housing Hoefkade corner Jacob Catsstraat, East side of the street.

Most of the neighbourhood dating from the end of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century was broken down in the 1980s and new housing was built.

The blocks on these pictures were designed by Álvaro Siza (1933), who had a good reputation in co-operating with future inhabitants of social housing projects, in collaboration with architects Jeroen Geurst (1960) and Rens Schulze (1960).

They were built in 1989-1993. In the rigorous gable of the block Siza very much stuck to the Dutch 19th century urban tradition of red-brown bricks and the Hague tradition of recesses with steep stairs in the façades.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Wayne Thiebaud; Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar

I went to Museum Voorlinden to write a review about the present Wayne Thiebaud retrospective for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

As I have written quite extensively about the show in VLR, I leave you here with some pictures of details that struck me.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Wayne Thiebaud, the owners of the works and Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar.

Bertus Pieters