Lucius Pax, Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Petra Knötschke; Kunsthaus Knötschke, The Hague

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

There are developing more small scale art spaces in The Hague these days, varying from shop windows and tiny galleries to living room pop-up exhibitions like this one in Petra Knötschke’s house.

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Lucius Pax

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Lucius Pax

Three artists are exhibiting in the two storeys of the house: Petra Knötschke herself, who shows objects, Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek with ceramic vases and Lucius Pax, paintings.

Petra Knötschke

Petra Knötschke

Lucius Pax

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Knötschke’s objects, made of wood, metal and other materials, look like un-mechanical mechanisms, improvisations that live by themselves.

Lucius Pax

Lucius Pax

Lucius Pax

Vismans’ vases may appear like ‘real’ vases but they may also develop into almost corporeal objects, both opened and closed.

Lucius Pax

Lucius Pax, Petra Knötschke

Petra Knötschke, Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Lucius Pax, always painting life as a thriller movie, shows some works based on German ‘Krimis’ (criminal tv-series) and German erotic movies.

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek, Lucius Pax

Anne-Marie Vismans-Rijssenbeek

Lucius Pax

Petra Knötschke

The whole show is well-arranged and is only open this weekend (23-24 June).

Lucius Pax

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists.

Bertus Pieters

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Lula Valletta, Purgatorio; Hok gallery, The Hague

Hok Gallery (hok is Dutch for cage) is the newest and – with just eleven square metres walking space – also the smallest gallery in The Hague.

It opened its doors this month, and in bimonthly exhibitions it tries to connect with the underground pop culture.

As such – tiny as it is – it could become an interesting and again diversifying addition to art life in The Hague.

Its first exhibition shows collages by Lula Valletta.

In these collages, many of them based on the famous Ghent Altarpiece, she seems to hark back to Dada and German art of the Interwar period.

The rediscovery of the less “stable” art movements of the 20th century seems to become more prominent in European art these day.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Lula Valletta and Hok Gallery, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #64

Blocks of social housing Hoefkade corner Jacob Catsstraat, East side of the street.

Most of the neighbourhood dating from the end of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century was broken down in the 1980s and new housing was built.

The blocks on these pictures were designed by Álvaro Siza (1933), who had a good reputation in co-operating with future inhabitants of social housing projects, in collaboration with architects Jeroen Geurst (1960) and Rens Schulze (1960).

They were built in 1989-1993. In the rigorous gable of the block Siza very much stuck to the Dutch 19th century urban tradition of red-brown bricks and the Hague tradition of recesses with steep stairs in the façades.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Wayne Thiebaud; Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar

I went to Museum Voorlinden to write a review about the present Wayne Thiebaud retrospective for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

As I have written quite extensively about the show in VLR, I leave you here with some pictures of details that struck me.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Wayne Thiebaud, the owners of the works and Museum Voorlinden, Wassenaar.

Bertus Pieters

Enclosed Volume, works by Geert Baas, Niko de Wit and Yumiko Yoneda; Ramakers Galerie, The Hague

Yumiko Yoneda

To make a statement about volume, the sensuality of its surface, the bulkiness of its mass, the ambiguity of its content and inclusively a lot more, you don’t need a hundred artists, you only need three very good ones.

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

That much is clear from the present show of recent and new works by Geert Baas (1955), Niko de Wit (1948) and Yumiko Yoneda (1965) at Galerie Ramakers.

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

Niko de Wit

Geert Baas

Niko de Wit

Baas, De Wit and Yoneda are very different artists but their works potentially intensify each other.

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Geert Baas

Geert Baas

Geert Baas

All three seem to aim at a certain perfection of thought.

Geert Baas

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Even in the tongue in cheek looking objects by Baas it is their aesthetic perfection that puzzles most.

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

There is of course a remarkable discrepancy between the angularity of De Wit’s works and the soft curviness of Yoneda’s objects.

Geert Baas

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

Yumiko Yoneda

Geert Baas

However their differences evolve into a dialogue in this wonderful ménage a trois.

Geert Baas

Geert Baas

Geert Baas

Geert Baas

Geert Baas

For any group exhibition you need dialogue and space, which in this case becomes a statement of aesthetics..

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Niko de Wit

Geert Baas

This is an exhibition to enjoy and wonder, and one which I highly recommend.

Geert Baas

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and to Ramakers Galerie, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Pieter Paul Pothoven, facade suspended; Dürst Britt & Mayhew, The Hague

I visited Dürst Britt & Mayhew to write a review for Villa La Repubblica about Pieter Paul Pothoven’s installation facade suspended. Click here to read the review (in Dutch)

Pothoven (1981) realised an installation that deals with the activist group RaRa (Revolutionary Anti-Racism Action; “rara” being a Dutch expression for “you guess”).

In the second half of the 1980s they committed arson attacks against Dutch companies who invested in South Africa and who were as such seen as supporters of the apartheid regime which was still waging its violent rule.

Although damage cost millions of Dutch guilders, there were no victims.

Pothoven focuses on the shop front of the house which was raided by Dutch police in 1988 in which they hoped to find the nerve centre of RaRa and tons of proof.

To no avail and RaRa is still a kind of a mystery.

As I have written quite extensively on Villa La Repubblica I leave you here with some impressions, but do go and take a look yourself!

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all pictures courtesy to Pieter Paul Pothoven and Dürst Britt & Mayhew, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #63

Façade of the building of painters’ association (‘schilderkundig genootschap’) Pulchri Studio, Lange Voorhout.

Originally built in the 16th century, it got its present appearance in the 18th century.

Many of its inhabitants had chic names, all but a few forgotten by now.

The building was bought by Pulchri Studio (‘For the Study of Beauty’; the association was founded in 1847) in 1896 and was opened by the association in 1901.

Pulchri Studio (in short Pulchri) still exists and the association’s building has some of the most wonderful exhibition spaces in The Hague, although it should be said that exhibitions not always live up to that magnificence.

On the other hand Pulchri is the grand old lady of The Hague art institutions and is a household name, which, as such, should be cherished.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Martin Gabriel, non beton place; The Balcony, The Hague

Sometimes artists need just little space to show their work.

A pop up exhibition space like a shop window can be enough; especially so for multi-disciplinary artist Martin Gabriel (1991) who is occupied with space, even creating it where it is not.

At the moment The Balcony is a shop window at 14 Herenstraat which has an exhibition programme and Gabriel is showing his installation non beton place there.

Reflection and extension play an important role in the work.

It might seem that with a camera (or without one for that matter) the window itself is an obstacle, but on the other hand the reflections in the shop window bring even more space into the composition.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Martin Gabriel and The Balcony, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters