[At] Home, works by Hamid El Kanbouhi, Fernando Sánchez Castillo and Marjan Teeuwen; Nouvelles Images, The Hague

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

The title [At] Home covers only part of the present exhibition at Nouvelles Images. For instance guest artist Fernando Sánchez Castillo (1970) shows his video Guernica Syndrome, Azor.

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

Azor was Franco’s yacht. Sánchez bought it and had it demolished to neat parcels of junk.

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

The definitive demolition goes on overnight and looks like a faint echo of the demolition of Guernica.

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

But it also shows that the trauma of the Franco era is still there in Sánchez’s homeland Spain (and sadly we can still witness it in recent developments there).

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

History, perception and its traumas are also part of Hamid El Kanbouhi’s (1976) great and impressive installation Take a LeaFe,

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

It tries to balance between different cultures, expectations and facts.

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen (1956) shows her photo series Destroyed House Gaza, probably the most literal interpretation of the show’s title.

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

She shows the destroyed house as a stage of remembrance, its trauma and its re-ordered emptiness.

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

In a way they may remind you of Anselm Kiefer’s paintings of the 1980s.

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Marjan Teeuwen

Remembrance and destruction, the more they become traumatic the more they become monumental as well.

Marjan Teeuwen

Fernando Sánchez Castillo

As such Nouvelles Images has made a very coherent and moving show in which the aesthetics of all three artists communicate very well.

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Demolition and distortion and us trying to find a way, a place and a reason in them, traumatic as they may seem, have an aesthetics of their own.

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Hamid El Kanbouhi

Earlier works by El Kanbouhi and Teeuwen are adding to these aesthetics.

Hamid El Kanbouhi

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Galerie Nouvelles Images, Den Haag.

 

Bertus Pieters

Advertisements

Façades of The Hague #51

In December 2015 the permanent International Criminal Court was opened.

It was designed by Danish bureau Schmidt Hammer Lassen architects.

It should reflect both power and trust, transparency and fortification of law and democracy.

It was built on the premises of a former army barracks on the edge of the sand dunes along the coast.

That makes the mighty six towering blocks a marker in the landscape.

Coming from the coast it can be seen emerging from the dunes.

Its ecological footprint is said to be as small as possible.

In spite of its colossal dimensions it also has quite some elegance in its outer design (i haven’t yet seen its interior).

It is situated in the triangle Van Alkemadelaan, Maurits Kiekpad and Oude Waalsdorperweg where it has its main entrance.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

Art The Hague 2017, Fokker Terminal, The Hague

Although still one of the smaller art fairs, Art The Hague has expanded a bit this year.

Jan Henderikse, Schoots & Van Duyse, Antwerp

Jan Henderikse, Schoots & Van Duyse, Antwerp

Joel Mpah Dooh, Sanaa, Utrecht

The restaurant has been removed from the main hangar to one of the side rooms which has created more space to present more galleries and to create more leeway for visitors.

Joel Mpah Dooh, Sanaa, Utrecht

Joel Mpah Dooh, Sanaa, Utrecht

Anton Vrede, Hommes, Rotterdam

Art The Hague describes itself as ‘quirky’, but that probably still needs some time, as still some more kitsch could be removed, although progress has been made in that field (and i seem to be a hardliner on the subject).

Wycliffe Mundopa, Twelve twelve, The Hague

Gert Scheerlinck, Twelve twelve, The Hague

Emanuel Tegene, WTC The Hague Art Gallery

And wouldn’t it be a good idea to ask galleries not to show more than three artists each?

Emanuel Tegene, WTC The Hague Art Gallery

Ron Amir, WTC The Hague Art Gallery

Karolina Orzelek, Dukan, Paris, Leipzig

Of course galleries would like to present themselves as one big and divers family but does that really add to the characters of these galleries?

Geert Baas, Ramakers, The Hague

Pat Andrea, Ramakers, The Hague

Andrea Freckmann, Maurits van de Laar, The Hague

With only three artists a gallery can really make a statement about itself without being excessive and new artists may get more attention.

Andrea Freckmann, Maurits van de Laar, The Hague

Hamid El Kanbouhi, Nouvelles Images, The Hague

Marc Mulders, Dom’Arte, Rucphen

Especially in a smaller fair the focus on individual artists could be an asset.

Elke Lutgerink, Wilms, Venlo

Elke Lutgerink, Wilms, Venlo

Elke Lutgerink, Wilms, Venlo

Art The Hague promised some focus on African artists, but that doesn’t really stand out.

David Pedraza, Heden, The Hague

Jef Gysen, Shoobil, Antwerp

Erik Buijs, Huub Hannen, Maastricht

To really focus on something like the African art market you need to be very well prepared and you need to invest in research, otherwise the quality – as it is now – will be mixed.

Coen Vernooij, O-68, Velp

Gregor Gaida, Hoorn en Reniers, The Hague

Lucius Pax, WTC The Hague

The ‘quirkiness’ of the fair is probably best presented in its side rooms.

Robbie Cornelissen, Maurits van de Laar, The Hague

Kevin Rausch, Hoorn en Reniers, The Hague

Paul Nassenstein, Luycks, Tilburg

This year the second floor isn’t used but the ground floor has been refurbished and tries to present an alternative to Drawing Amsterdam, which will be missed this year.

Erika Cotteleer, Shoobil, Antwerp

Hamid El Kanbouhi, Nouvelles Images, The Hague

Jimi Kleinbruinink, Allard Wildenberg, Naarden

Of course only four rooms can’t be an alternative to a whole fair but the presentations are very good and they make for one the best aspects of the fair.

Jimi Kleinbruinink, Allard Wildenberg, Naarden

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all picture courtey to the artists, the galleries and Art The Hague 2017.

 

Bertus Pieters

Ton of Holland, Medical Body Jewels; Galerie Ramakers, The Hague

With collages, embroidery and paint Ton of Holland (Ton Hoogerwerf, 1956) shows in Galerie Ramakers works in which the usually somewhat obnoxious world of disease becomes a world of symbolism and a kind of decadent aesthetics.

He does so unabashedly and with a sense of humour through which an understanding of the realities of our lives as biological creatures is felt.

It is fun, beautiful and maybe a bit painful.

The show is in its last week, so hurry up to see it all in real/unreal!

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Ton of Holland and Galrie Ramakers, Den Haag.

 

Bertus Pieters

Shen Wei, Between Blossoms; SinArts Gallery, The Hague

I visited SinArts Gallery to write an article for Villa La Repubblica about Shen Wei’s (1977) present show. Click here to read the article (in Dutch).

SinArts is a young gallery specialising in works by Chinese artists which is an absolute asset here.

For those who are following art photography Shen Wei may not be unknown, so it’s great to have his work now on show in The Hague.

Making pictures of a photo exhibition on a sunny autumn day is not the best of jobs, so it’s better to see the real thing, which i highly recommend.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Shen Wei and SinArts Gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #50

Building with apartments and shops, Valeriusstraat corner Lübeckstraat, built in the 1950s to fill in the gap of the wasteland created by the German WWII Atlantic Wall.

Clearly the building is in post-WWII modernist style, even so it has two so-called gable stones (or wall stones) in its side façade in Lübeckstraat.

Traditionally gable stones contain some text or a relief explaining something about the owner or the history of the building.

In this case they show a lady, sitting in between two flowers while playing  a kind of harp. Both concrete gable stones are the same.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Picture 1 taken in March 2016, pictures 2,3 and 4 taken in May 2016, picture 5 taken in March 2017.

 

Bertus Pieters

Christie van der Haak, Elmar Trenkwalder; Galerie Maurits van de Laar, The Hague

Both artists in Maurits van de Laar’s gallery’s present exhibition, Elmar Trenkwalder (1959) and Christie van der Haak (1950), take ornamentation out of its generally presumed decorative context.

In Trenkwalder’s works ornaments become corporeal, especially in his more sculptural ceramics, whose uniformity in colour and material invites the viewer to look and scrutinise more closely.

It might have been a kind of a challenge to integrate Trenkwalder’s objects more with Van der Haak’s installation.

Now, although some of them are shown in the same space as Van der Haak’s, they still retain their full sovereignty, which is just as well.

Van der Haak’s installation contains wallpaper, paintings, ceramics, epoxy resin panels  and upholstered chairs.

Focusing may seem to be a bit puzzling but that is also part of the fun and charm as Van der Haak makes you look in different ways.

There is no difference in hierarchy between any object or its surroundings.

Some objects come out clearly, others seem to have a camouflage colour.

As always Van der Haak wonderfully combines a festive mood with the intimacy of the gaze.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Elmar Trenkwalder, Christie van der Haak and Galerie Maurits van de Laar, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Marin de Jong, Chronicle for the Millions; Twelve twelve Gallery, The Hague

Twelve twelve Gallery presently shows latest works by Marin de Jong (1976).

Working in our post-postmodern age De Jong is trying to find answers to the fast and disturbing de-rationalisation of society we are experiencing these days.

More than before people seem to be prepared to believe in irrational plots, nonsensical scare mongering and the vilification of any intelligence, including the arts.

De Jong reacts by covering up some of his works, literally closing them down for the expecting gaze, but he does so with humour.

As we have learnt from Christo, covering up doesn’t just hide the covered object, it also creates a new object.

De Jong shows how art will move on in spite of everything, like a fungus that doesn’t stop growing and multiplying.

Far from going underground, his works manifest themselves with character in spite of their subjects being internalised.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Marin de Jong and Twelve twelve Gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters