Bieke Depoorter, As it may be; The Hague Museum for Photography

In its basement The Hague Museum for Photography shows works by Bieke Depoorter (1986) from her recent collection As it may be.

Depoorter tried to look behind the front doors of Egyptians to give a more intimate view of Egyptian daily life.

They have become delicate, sensitive and very rich pictures of a daily world that is unknown to outsiders.

During a later visit she has asked Egyptians to write their reactions about the photographs in the pictures themselves.

That is an interesting turn in what would otherwise be a more or less exotic, ethnographic series, rich in detail and beautiful as it is.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Bieke Depoorter and The Hague Museum for Photography

 

Bertus Pieters

Advertisements

Hans Eijkelboom, Identities 1970 – 2017; The Hague Museum of Photography

Since the 1960s Western Europe is living in the age of consumerism which is now our all pervading way of life.

To maintain or build an identity has become something for the market as well.

You might be mistaken that identity is a matter of religion, nationality, ethnicity or whatever.

Forget it, identities are simply bought these days, they are trade.

That is most obvious in your clothing.

Observing people’s struggle to have an identity due to or in spite of the market has been and still is Hans Eijkelboom’s (1949) main subject as a photographer.

The Museum of Photography shows a retrospective of his work.

There are his early projects where he often plays a role himself in front of the camera, while his later sequences where he compares people wearing the same kind of cloths are also extensively present.

Eijkelboom doesn’t judge his subjects, he just observes them and seems to be constantly amazed by the commonness of his fellow human beings and the way they try to escape that commonness.

Hans Eijkelboom 19

There is a dry but not wry sense of humour in his works.

Everybody who is interested in how we look alike and how we don’t in our public lives – as i do –  should see this.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Hans Eijkelboom and The Hague Museum of Photography.

 

Bertus Pieters

Inez Smit, Marena Seeling, Lines, form, spaces and other; Galerie Helder, The Hague

Inez Smit

Galerie Helder shows paintings by two artists, Inez Smit (1967) and Marena Seeling (1953), who make abstract work.

Inez Smit

Inez Smit

Inez Smit

While works of both artists go very well together, the show is also a dialogue of differences.

Inez Smit

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

Seeling’s work derives from vast polder landscapes, abstracted until only its light and space remain, even in the smallest works.

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

In Smit’s works space seems to be rediscovered in non-objective compositions.

Inez Smit

Inez Smit

It is a modest exhibition, but it has a lot of perspectives to offer.

Inez Smit

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Galerie Helder, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #56

Sculpture called Multipipe.

Placed in 1977 it is stylistically a true monument to its time: playful, abstract, and transparently constructed of industrial materials.

It was designed by a group of three artists (they appropriately called themselves De Groep – ‘The Group’): Peter ten Hoorn (1934), Henk van der Plas (1936 – 2009) and Fred van de Walle (1942).

Positioned along Escamplaan it could be interpreted as a joyful goodbye to travellers to the greenhouse horticulture area south of The Hague, the so called Westland.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were made in March 2017

 

Bertus Pieters

Feedback #1, Marshall McLuhan and the arts; West, The Hague

Mogens Jacobsen

The present exhibition at West, spread over both locations at Lange Voorhout and Groenewegje, looks like a first presentation of a new gallery or a new artists’ platform.

Mogens Jacobsen

Mogens Jacobsen

It doesn’t lack ambition at all and works by 15 artists and artists groups are on show.

Harun Farocki

Harun Farocki

It must have been quite an effort to give every work the space and attention it needs, even more so as most works need technology to make them work.

Angela Washko

Angela Washko

It also means there are 15 different ways of seeing, 15 different worlds for the viewer to swallow.

Disnovation

Reynold Reynolds

Reynold Reynolds

That is hardly possible on a rainy November afternoon as every feature needs attention, let alone the excess of information about Marshall McLuhan (1911-1980), the inspirer of the show.

Reynold Reynolds

Thomas Bégin

Thomas Bégin

It is clear an institute like West needs another way of seeing from the viewer than an average modern art museum.

Mediengruppe Bitnik

Mediengruppe Bitnik

Wolfgang Spahn

That is all right, very good even, but a show like this awakens high expectations for the next exhibitions.

Wolfgang Spahn

Wolfgang Spahn

Wolfgang Spahn

All fifteen works bare a promise to give more, to show more, to linger more on the subject and on the world of the specific artist or artists group.

MRZB

MRZB

MRZB

All works have to do, in one way or another, with Marshall McLuhan’s ideas about media (‘the medium is the message’, remember that one?), technology and the role of the artist.

MRZB

Darsha Hewitt, Stephanie Syjuco

Darsha Hewitt, Stephanie Syjuco

Although very coherent, problem is that the show doesn’t really evoke dialogue between the works.

Darsha Hewitt

Darsha Hewit

Stephanie Syjuco

It is as if dialogue is saved for the following exhibitions.

Hito Steyerl

Hito Steyerl

Christof Migone

If that is so, expectations can’t be anything but very high.

Willy Lemaitre

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and to West, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Niek Hendrix, The Theatre of Memories; De Ketelfactory, Schiedam

To write an article for Villa La Repubblica about Niek Hendrix’ (1985) present exhibition i visited the Ketelfactory gallery in Schiedam. Click here to read the article (in Dutch).

As i have written quite extensively about the show on VLR i leave you here with some pictures.

Needless to say you’d better go to the Ketelfactory to see it yourself.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Niek Hendrix and De Ketelfactory, Schiedam

 

Bertus Pieters

Lorena van Bunningen, Still Movements; Heden, The Hague

Lorena van Bunningen (1990) has a small but very interesting exhibition at Heden.

She shows objects – objects themselves or pictures of them – that are unpresentable at first sight, but indefinable as well. In that way she makes a mystery of the commonplace.

Heden’s basement gallery seems to be a very good place to uncover that mystery.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Lorena van Bunningen and Heden, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #55

House with shop front and balcony Laan van Meerdervoort corner Valkenboskade.

Probably built around 1913.

The shop front has probably been modified later.

The Valkenboskade façade shows a fine composition of door, windows and gable.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters