Edward Krasinski; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

I visited the great retrospective exhibition of Edward Krasiński’s work at the Amsterdam Stedelijk Museum to write a review for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

The presentation at the Stedelijk is a more or less chronological one which i followed.

Those who have never heard of Krasiński (1925–2004) should see this exhibition absolutely (as should those who have).

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the owners of the works and to Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

 

Bertus Pieters

Everything We Could Not Keep, works by Eva Spierenburg and Elsbeth Ciesluk; Galerie Maurits van de Laar, The Hague

Eva Spierenburg

The title of the show has a bit of a melancholic undertone, but that is where the absurdism of both artists, Eva Spierenburg (1987) and Elsbeth Ciesluk (1986), leads to.

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Both artists in this very well conceived show at Maurits van de Laar gallery seem to be in search of things somewhere in between being materially not there, and lost from mind the moment you think of it.

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Spierenburg does so with paintings, drawings, videos and sculptural works and Ciesluk mainly with text works.

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Spierenburg’s works have a wide range of aspects, but usually the human body is central to it.

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Eva Spierenburg

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Ciesluk’s works are in between poetry and visual art.

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

One of her works was made on the wall of the gallery.

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

Elsbeth Ciesluk

I was very late in visiting this show, the finissage will be next Sunday, so do hurry to see this fine exhibition.

Elsbeth Ciesluk

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and to Galerie Maurits van de Laar, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Skulptur Projekte, Münster (North Rhine-Westphalia); Day 2

Click here to read the review of Skulptur Projekte 2017 on Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch). Click here to see pictures of the first day of our visit to Münster on Villa Next Door.

The next morning we took a fresh look at what we still wanted to see.

As the Cherry Column by Thomas Schütte (1954) of the 1987 edition of Skulptur Projekte was round the corner we went to see that one. In the small square where Schütte’s cherries are, there is a sandpit at the moment, where children are playing in the sunshine.

En route we visited St. Lambert’s Church, originally built late 14th century and first half of the 15th century with a late 19th century neo-gothic spire.

During WWII the spire, roof and choir were damaged, but the church was reconstructed after the war in the 1950s.

From gothic and neo-gothic to a disco to celebrate German super kitsch, well, what is the difference?

Brazilian duo Bárbara Wagner (1980) and Benjamin de Búrca (1975) made a film about the German Schlager phenomenon and show it in the Elephant Lounge disco.

Empty by daytime the disco has a strangely artificial atmosphere, the kitschy atmosphere where visitors celebrate kitsch both to forget and in recognition of daily hardships.

And then, passing the originally 13th century Apostelkirche (Apostle Church) to the Theater Münster, one of the first modern theatres built in Germany after WWII, to see Matrix by Studio CAMP, about which i commented in the review at VLR.

Passing along the cathedral we had a closer look at the bronze crucifix group by Bert Gerresheim (1935) we saw the evening before.

It was erected in 2004 and has to do with the catholic history of the city, presenting historical figures of Münster.

Clearly the hanging Christ was inspired by the Isenheim Altar by Matthias Grünewald of 1515 (Musée d’Unterlinden, Colmar).

Near the museum you may find a work by Richard Tuttle (1941), Art and Music I and II of the 1987 edition.

They look like apostrophes or like F-clefs and are positioned on either side of a wall.

They are in a more or less anonymous alley in the city centre.

They look very unobtrusive.

On the wall somebody tells you that pornography is violence.

On the floor there happened to be more objects that reminded me of works by Tuttle (an artist i highly esteem, by the way).

Not far away from there, on a lawn alongside the late 16th century (and partly very late gothic) Petrikirche (St. Peter’s Church), is Cut Dolomite by Ulrich Rückriem (1938) from the very first edition of Skulptur Projekte in 1977.

As usual Rückriem’s method of simply cutting and rearranging a rock never seems to fail in its monumentality.

The work easily becomes one with its environment and gives it strength.

Very near along the River Aa is a very small but wonderful work by Giovanni Anselmo (1934):

Shortened Heavens of the 1987 edition.

Verkürzter Himmel (Shortened Heavens) is engraved on top, almost defying everything over it, and bringing Heaven back to Earth, so to say.

From the same edition is The Meadow Smiles or The Face in the Wall by Harald Klingelhöller (1954) in the courtyard of the law faculty of the city’s university.

It exists of mirrors and yew trees behind it.

You may or may not think it is in the shape of a smile, but it brings a smile to anyone’s face anyway, without being explicitly humorous or hilarious.

The many-sidedness of Klingelhöller’s work may also signify a difference between the law faculty and the theology faculty where Anselmo’s work is.

Here some tourist is trying to fix me into his holiday album.

Not all art of the present edition is convincing, like this cartoon-like work by Sany (Samuel Nyholm, 1973), which seems to be funny.

Back to the museum there is a new encounter with the fine building and Rückriem’s Granite (Normandy) (1985), here in combination with Moore’s sculpture, Bonin’s and Burr’s installation and over it Gerdes’ Angst (see the report of day 1).

At the car park (we decided to take the car to see the rest) there is a fresco on a façade called 500 Jahre Kolonialisierung und Widerstand (500 Years of Colonisation and Resistance) made in the Columbus year 1992 by an untraceable Colombian artist called Saúl Gutiérrez.

I wrote in my review on VLR about this work by Schütte, which is one of my favourites.

This is not art but the air conditioning of the LBS building, but even so it’s quite impressive.

In the building Hito Steyerl (1966) presents her HellYeahWeFuckDie.

I like her essays but i haven’t been a fan of her visual art and i’m afraid this work didn’t change my mind.

Maybe it would be interesting as an illustration of an essay.

In the park nearby is the 2007 edition’s We are still and reflective by Martin Boyce (1967). Its straight lines may remind you of a jigsaw puzzle, but also of the abstracted shapes of trees.

It’s a wonderful work somewhere in between a drawing and a sculpture and it works well with the shades of trees over it.

Again, not an official work of art but under the circumstances anything may become a sculpture in Münster.

The winter sports hall with the magnificent installation (installation doesn’t seem to be the right word for this living diorama)  After ALife Ahead by Pierre Huyghe (1962) was our last stop in Münster.

I wrote extensively about it in the VLR review.

I hope to live to see the next edition of Skulptur Projekte in 2027!

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy top the artists

Many thanks to Jean van Wijk and Marion de Korte.

Bertus Pieters

Wycliffe Mundopa, Tongogara; Twelve twelve Gallery, The Hague

I visited Twelve twelve Gallery to write an article about Wycliffe Mundopa’s (1987) solo show for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the article (in Dutch).

The article is about the painting Inheritance, shown here with some details.

I leave you with the pictures here, as i have commented already extensively in VLR, with the recommendation to go and take a look for yourself.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Wycliffe Mundopa and Twelve twelve Gallery, Den Haag.

 

Bertus Pieters

Post-Peace; Nest, The Hague

Ella de Búrca

I visited Nest to write a review for Villa La Repubblica about Post-Peace, an exhibition in which thirteen artists deal with peace and how it is attained and maintained. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

Dorian de Rijk

Anastasiya Yarovenko

As i’ve written quite extensively in VLR  about the show i leave you here with some more pictures.

Anastasiya Yarovenko

Ella de Búrca

Radek Szlaga

Radek Szlaga

Radek Szlaga

Radek Szlaga

Radek Szlaga

Radek Szlaga

Radek Szlaga

Anika Schwarzlose

Anika Schwarzlose

Anika Schwarzlose

Adrian Melis

Adrian Melis

Sven Augustijnen

Sven Augustijnen

Lyubov Matyunina

Lyubov Matyunina

Lyubov Matyunina

Lyubov Matyunina

Lyubov Matyunina

Lyubov Matyunina

Lyubov Matyunina

Lyubov Matyunina

Yazan Khalili

Anna Dasovic

Anna Dasovic

Alexei Taruts

Alevtina Kakhidze

Alevtina Kakhidze

Alevtina Kakhidze

belit sag

belit sag

belit sag

belit sag

belit sag

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Nest, Den Haag.

 

Bertus Pieters

Nies Vooijs and Riet Vooijs; oil paintings and analog photographs; Magasin Horaz, The Hague

Paintings by Nies Vooijs and analog photography by Riet Vooijs are on show in a small new initiative in Magasin Horaz, Molenstraat 19.

Both sisters are amongst the most respected of artists in this city, as far as i am concerned.

They share an occupation with volatility.

Nies’ compositions may change and show a working process, while Riet’s photographs – strongly thought from their negatives – show moments which are not decisive but characteristic.

[Click on the pictures to enblarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of pictures courtesy to Nies and Riet Vooijs and to Magasin Horaz, The Hague

 

Bertus Pieters

Willem Goedegebuure, Deadly decorative; JCA de Kok, The Hague

Political or social engagement may be hot items in present day visual art.

It may give a boost to the image of an individual artist, his/her curator or buyer and to his/her bank account,

but how politically or socially engaged can a work of art really be?

Willem Goedegebuure’s (1953) recent paintings which he presently shows at JCA de Kok, could easily be taken for politically inspired works.

But are they?

Indeed they may deal with pictures taken in Iraq or the Crimea, but at the same time they may also represent seemingly common place scenes, painted with the same eloquence.

Goedegebuure isn’t a man of glamour, neither does he make glamorous paintings.

His representations may evoke different feelings with the viewer, puzzled as you are by what you are actually seeing,

why it is the subject of a painting and why it was painted the way it is.

And don’t be misled!

Goedegebuure’s works seem to have been made with the greatest ease.

However, look again and discover they are quite virtuoso paintings, in their technique and in the way they show you the world.

They don’t tell you how to be right or wrong in this world, they just tell.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Willem Goedegebuure and JCA de Kok, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Going Forward, 100 Years after De Stijl; A Gallery Named Sue, The Hague

Guido Winkler

The centennial of De Stijl has become a victim of marketing in The Hague,

Guido Winkler

Guido Winkler

Guido Winkler

but happily for A Gallery Named Sue it is a good excuse to show some works by present day artists who make non-figurative or non-objective work,

John Tallman

Jan Maarten Voskuil

each finding freedom in his/her own restrictions.

Justin Andrews

Jan Maarten Voskuil

Some work internationally, to globally keep alive the idea of using basic shapes and simple but purposeful colours,

Jan Maarten Voskuil

Hernán Ardila Delgado

Hernán Ardila Delgado

stressing their spiritual rather than their decorative aspect.

Jan Maarten Voskuil

Billy Gruner

It’s a fine show with very different works by artists from Australia (Justin Andrews and Billy Gruner), Colombia (Hernán Ardila Delgado), the Netherlands (Henriëtte van ‘t Hoog, Jan Maarten Voskuil en Guido Winkler) and from the United States (John Tallman).

Henriëtte van ‘t Hoog

John Tallman

All works, as shown in AGNS, generate a kind of intimacy in spite of their sometimes extremely simple design.

John Tallman

Henriëtte van ‘t Hoog

Guido Winkler

In the ‘little project room’ there is also a work by Sarah Keighery, made with pepper.

Sarah Keighery

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to the artists and A Gallery Named Sue, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters