A Blue Room, Quartair, The Hague

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

At Quartair eight artists were invited to reflect artistically on quotations from the oeuvre of Louis Couperus (1863-1923), one of the greatest novelists in the Dutch language. The artists were free to choose from Couperus’ works.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Wieteke Heldens chose from The Tour (Antiek toerisme) and Ecstacy (Extaze), collected from these texts all words indicating a colour and tried to reproduce them in two paintings.

EBK 05 Robbert Pauwels
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Robbert Pauwels, who likes using pedestals for his works and referring to classical and baroque sculpture,

EBK 07 Robbert Pauwels
EBK 08 Robbert Pauwels

appropriately took a passage from the novella Psyche to make his Psyche and Eros.

EBK 09 Geeske Harting

Couperus, as a real fin de siècle novelist, was refined and often described the tarnishing or decay of beauty. Geeske Harting was

EBK 10 Geeske Harting

clearly inspired by that element in her surprising diptych Spleen with withering violets, which she based on parts of About me and others (Van en over mijzelf en anderen).

EBK 11 Astrid Nobel
EBK 12 Astrid Nobel

Astrid Nobel chose three passages from Metamorphosis (Metamorfoze) for her work Niet meer hetzelfde (Not the same anymore, based on the quote “It was the same as what had been and still: not the same anymore”) and she combines different other elements of the text in it.

EBK 13 Tim Breukers
EBK 14 Tim Breukers

Vert de l’abîme (sorry to say, but it is vertige de l’abîme) by Tim Breukers is based on a trifle called The binoculars (De binocle) about an opera visitor who, sitting high in a balcony seat,

EBK 15 Tim Breukers
EBK 16 Tim Breukers

can hardly resist throwing his opera glasses on a bald head deep down in the opera hall during a Walküre staging. Indeed Breukers creates a real abîme with a leftover of his visit to the top, where he could have… might have….

EBK 17 Hans Hoekstra

Hans Hoekstra’s painting Van Oudijcks val (Van Oudijck’s Fall) is based on the final part of the novel The Hidden Force (De stille kracht) where a high officer in the colonial Dutch East Indies, Van Oudijck, a man with phlegmatic Dutch authority, is worn out completely by the country and its magic.

EBK 18 Hans Hoekstra

Although the theme is clear in the otherwise attractive painting, I don’t really see the link to the story in particular to Van Oudijck.

EBK 19 Selma van Panhuis
EBK 20 Selma van Panhuis

Selma van Panhuis had herself inspired by a passage from Footsteps of Fate (Noodlot) with one of the novel’s protagonists thinking about his mistrust of human intuition.

EBK 21 Selma van Panhuis
EBK 22 Selma van Panhuis

Surely Van Panhuis shows the power of intuition which is part of her work and as such she shows you can’t escape from fate.

EBK 23 Pim Voorneman
EBK 24 Pim Voorneman
EBK 25 Pim Voorneman

Pim Voorneman shows in his installation Pièce de milieu, based on a passage from Ecstacy, the sensuousness of objects in a stifling bourgeois interior as it is often described by Couperus in his great novels.

Geeske Harting

Geeske Harting

Altogether this is a very fine exhibition curated within a very original framework, appropriately staged in The Hague, as Couperus often described the upper middle class of The Hague in his books.

Astrid Nobel

Astrid Nobel

There is an audio tour available in which you can hear all relevant passages from Couperus’ books as read by Philip Peters. Alas, it is in Dutch only, but hearing Peters pronounce all the different colours for Heldens’ paintings must be a feast to anyone’s ears.

EBK 28
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Advertisements

André Kruysen at Ramakers Gallery, The Hague

André Kruysen 01

I visited Ramakers Gallery to write a review for the Villa La Repubblica blog about sculptor André Kruysen’s present exhibition. You can read the review (in Dutch) and see some more pictures here.

André Kruysen 02
André Kruysen 03
André Kruysen 04
André Kruysen 05

Kruysen is fascinated by modernist architecture and other influences of the modernist tradition.

André Kruysen 06
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
André Kruysen 09

Apart from abstract geometry one can also see echoes from surrealism and primitivism, but

André Kruysen 10
André Kruysen 11
André Kruysen 12

his main projects are light and nature that always seem to break into the order man creates.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
André Kruysen 14
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

That is especially clear in The quiet force of descent, a temporary project in the gallery, which

André Kruysen 16
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

brings light as a deconstructing force in the gallery together with a cascade solidified in time.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Instead of a room for exhibitions the place becomes an alternative architectural space.

André Kruysen 22
André Kruysen 23
André Kruysen 24

This great project together with the other objects and sculptures make for an intriguing exhibition.

André Kruysen 25
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Trial & Triumph, Royal Academy, The Hague

T&T 01

At the Royal Academy (KABK) there is at the moment a farewell exhibition for Johan van Oord, head of the Fine Arts department for the last 13 years. Dürst Britt & Mayhew have curated a show featuring works by twelve former students. It’s called Trial & Triumph, not exactly an understatement, but it’s a good show. I wrote a review about it for Villa La Repubblica (you can read it here in Dutch and there are some more pictures too) so I leave you with some pictures which may give you an impression of some things that caught my eye. Take it as an appetizer for a must-see!

Wieske Wester

Wieske Wester

Wieske Wester

Wieske Wester

Wieske Wester

Wieske Wester

Front: very minimal installation by Kianoosh Motallebi; back: works by Wieteke Heldens

Front: very minimal installation by Kianoosh Motallebi; back: works by Wieteke Heldens

Maja Klaassens

Maja Klaassens

Maja Klaassens

Maja Klaassens

Wieteke Heldens

Wieteke Heldens

Wieteke Heldens

Wieteke Heldens

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Maarten Boekweit

Myung Feyen

Myung Feyen

Myung Feyen

Myung Feyen

Myung Feyen

Myung Feyen

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Femmy Otten

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Eric Peter

Pim Blokker

Pim Blokker

Pim Blokker

Pim Blokker

Pim Blokker

Pim Blokker

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

Nare Eloyan

The Holls Collective

The Holls Collective

The Holls Collective

The Holls Collective

The Holls Collective

The Holls Collective

The Holls Collective

The Holls Collective

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Front: Statue of Johan van Oord by The Holls Collective; back: work by Nare Eloyan

Front: Statue of Johan van Oord by The Holls Collective; back: work by Nare Eloyan

T&T 54

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Ilja Walraven, DNA, Pulchri, The Hague

Ilja Walraven 01
Ilja Walraven 02
Ilja Walraven 03
Ilja Walraven 04
Ilja Walraven 05
Ilja Walraven 06
Ilja Walraven 07

I was late visiting Ilja Walraven’s show DNA in Pulchri during its last weekend (so hurry to go and see it!).

Ilja Walraven 08
Ilja Walraven 09
Ilja Walraven 10
Ilja Walraven 11
Ilja Walraven 12
Ilja Walraven 13
Ilja Walraven 14

In the great room of the gallery Walraven shows recent works, some of them quite monumental.

Ilja Walraven 15
Ilja Walraven 16
Ilja Walraven 17
Ilja Walraven 18
Ilja Walraven 19
Ilja Walraven 20
Ilja Walraven 21

Walraven’s oeuvre contains a kind of immense zoo of beasts and birds, in their abstraction varying from a kind of fossils to quasi-primitive signs, from toys to cartoons.

Ilja Walraven 22
Ilja Walraven 23
Ilja Walraven 24
Ilja Walraven 25
Ilja Walraven 26
Ilja Walraven 27
Ilja Walraven 28

They all seem to more or less escape their meanings, while at the same time ruling their own little kingdoms.

Ilja Walraven 29
Ilja Walraven 30
Ilja Walraven 31
Ilja Walraven 32

Talking about Walraven’s oeuvre, in the smaller room are older works on show.

Ilja Walraven 33
Ilja Walraven 34
Ilja Walraven 35
Ilja Walraven 36

They are mainly works which Walraven re-obtained from art borrowing institutions, which had to close down the last few years due to inclement art policies.

Ilja Walraven 37
Ilja Walraven 38
Ilja Walraven 39

He put the works on a heap and during the course of the show the pictures were hung on the gallery walls bit by bit.

Ilja Walraven 40
Ilja Walraven 41

Different apps connected to Walraven’s works by Rob Bothof are presented as well. There’s one of them with angels flying in the room.

Ilja Walraven 42
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Haagse Portretten (Hague Portraits), Grafische werkplaats Den Haag (The Hague Graphic Studio)

Haagse portretten 01
Haagse portretten (Hague portraits) is a sympathetic exhibition and workshop at Grafische werkplaats Den Haag (The Hague Graphic Studio). It aims at getting the public acquainted with graphic techniques, especially linocut.

Haagse portretten 04

proud amateur

The Graphic Studio invites amateurs to make their own self portraits in linocut and pose with the result for a digital picture. Both results are shown in and on a photo booth.

Haagse portretten 03

proud amateur

Haagse portretten 05

photo booth with linocuts by amateurs

Philip Akkerman

Philip Akkerman

It is combined with an exhibition of selfportraits by artists who are connected to The Hague.

Kees Koomen

Kees Koomen

Melle de Boer

Melle de Boer

Melle de Boer

Melle de Boer

Jerney de Wilde

Jerney de Wilde

Ondine de Kroon

Ondine de Kroon

Ilse Versluijs

Ilse Versluijs

It shows how the Grafische Werkplaats supports both artists and amateurs and it is great fun.

Ilse Versluijs

Ilse Versluijs

Ewoud van Rijn

Ewoud van Rijn

The workshop and the combined exhibition will travel in The Hague in 2015 and the coming year.

Toyin Loye

Toyin Loye

Jos de L'Orme

Jos de L’Orme

Maybe it would be a suggestion for the workshop also to visit an asylum seekers centre in The Hague?

Babette Wagenvoort

Babette Wagenvoort

Babette Wagenvoort

Babette Wagenvoort

It may give some relief and fun as it does to the Hague amateurs and artists.

happy amateurs

happy amateurs

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters

Now or never #3, GEM, The Hague

NON03 01

In Now or never #3 GEM presents artists who graduated from the Royal Academy (Koninklijke Academie – KABK) in The Hague in 2014 and 2015. This year’s is a particularly good edition, not just because of the good artists but also because their works are very well exhibited. There is a sense of unity in the show in spite of all the differences. Every artist has a space of his/her own.

NON03 02 Mirthe Klück
NON03 03 Mirthe Klück
NON03 04 Mirthe Klück
NON03 05 Mirthe Klück
NON03 06 Mirthe Klück
NON03 07 Mirthe Klück
NON03 08 Mirthe Klück

Some of Mirthe Klück’s works were shown at a small exhibition in Billytown’s Kitchen this summer (I reported about it here). I am eagerly awaiting even more new works.

NON03 09 Bjorn Barendse
NON03 10 Bjorn Barendse
NON03 11 Bjorn Barendse
NON03 12 Bjorn Barendse
NON03 13 Bjorn Barendse
NON03 14 Bjorn Barendse
NON03 15 Bjorn Barendse

The setting of Bjorn Barendse’s work in this show could hardly differ more from his presentation at the graduation show this year at the Royal Academy. His works, open to different interpretations, work very well together as an installation, as they did in his graduation show, but there is more breathing space for them in the GEM’s setting.

NON03 16 Jordan Herregraven
NON03 17 Jordan Herregraven
NON03 18 Jordan Herregraven
NON03 19 Jordan Herregraven
NON03 20 Jordan Herregraven

The works of Jordan Herregraven seem to be animal embodiments of human nature and compared to Herregraven’s graduation show they look quite naked and vulnerable in the bright lights of the GEM.

NON03 21 Martin Gabriel
NON03 22 Martin Gabriel
NON03 23 Martin Gabriel
NON03 24 Martin Gabriel
NON03 25 Martin Gabriel

Martin Gabriel mixes virtual reality, “real” reality and inner space in his paintings and computerworks.

NON03 26 Martin Gabriel

A very recent and quite interesting interactive work was on show at Noordwal 117 during Haags Hoogtij (the seasonal gallery night in The Hague). Disappointingly the program didn’t work when I visited GEM (please GEM/Gemeentemuseum, take care of these kind of things!).

NON03 27 Juuke Schoorl
NON03 28 Juuke Schoorl
NON03 29 Juuke Schoorl
NON03 30 Juuke Schoorl

Juuke Schoorl applies the human skin as artistic material in video and photography.

NON03 31 Elise Sothys
NON03 32 Elise Sothys
NON03 33 Elise Sothys
NON03 34 Elise Sothys
NON03 35 Elise Sothys

In the GEM Elise Sothys’ word-works have far more impact than they had in her graduation show. The you-me relationship between work of art and viewer in Sothys’ case is a strong and egocentric one that doesn’t tolerate any visual noise by other artists.

NON03 36 Lynne Brouwer
NON03 37 Lynne Brouwer
NON03 38 Lynne Brouwer
NON03 39 Lynne Brouwer
NON03 40 Lynne Brouwer

Lynne Brouwer explores the colours in waiting rooms etc. Though her photo book is interesting, i don’t very much see the point in her more monumental photo works. What is the point in duplicating the waiting room experience?

NON03 41 Vincent Both
NON03 42 Vincent Both

Vincent Both paints and draws on paper, or rather, he seems to draw from the paper, like a writer who sees his paper and thinks his text may be more in the paper than on it.

NON03 43 Olya Oleinic
NON03 44 Olya Oleinic
NON03 45 Olya Oleinic
NON03 46 Olya Oleinic

Olya Oleinic shows her Universal guide to everything again.

NON03 47 Mickey Yang
NON03 48 Mickey Yang
NON03 49 Mickey Yang
NON03 50 Mickey Yang
NON03 51 Mickey Yang

Those who admired Mickey Yang’s graduation show, as i did, will be familiar with her works presently on show.

NON03 52 Mickey Yang

I remember there should be smoke coming from this bowl, but didn’t see it when i visited GEM.

NON03 53 Esther Hovers
NON03 54 Esther Hovers
NON03 55 Esther Hovers
NON03 56 Esther Hovers
NON03 57 Esther Hovers
NON03 58 Esther Hovers
NON03 59 Esther Hovers

Esther Hovers’ presentation is about people in public space as seen by surveillance cameras. People become usually de-individualized in public space, but from the point of view of surveillance and security each person becomes an individual in another way. What’s more, these individuals could be you or me. What are you hiding in public space, while walking there? What makes you change your mind on a street corner?

NON03 60 Rixt de Boer
NON03 61 Rixt de Boer
NON03 62 Rixt de Boer

Rixt de Boer shows a video-essay-triptych about haystacks in relation to people and landscape in Central Europe. Surprisingly, the haystack is a monument of solidity in this work. It is also a peaceful and pastoral finish to this fine exhibition.

(More pictures of the graduation shows can be seen here and here)
(full reviews in Dutch of the graduation shows can be read here and here)

NON03 63
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters