Façades of The Hague #32

Late 19th century double villa, originally known as Duinaue (untranslatable name; left half of the building) and Benvenuta (Italian for welcome; right half), Badhuisweg, built near the coast as two chic hostels.

By the late 20th century it was a club and in the early 21st  century it was a sex club.

After that it became a night club, which was just closed down when these pictures were taken.

It reopened last year under a new name.

It was built as a very smart villa.

With the front windows walled up, it looks a bit uncouth these days and it probably won’t regain its old glory; i’m afraid its dilapidation won’t be stopped.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016.

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #28

0164-stadhouderslaan

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Apartment block Stadhouderslaan corner Lübeckstraat, early 1950s.

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Stadhouderslaan, the grand late 19th century avenue running from The Hague to Scheveningen harbour, was partly destroyed during WW II by the Germans for the Atlantic Wall, as was part of the infrastructure around it.

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The area was redesigned by architect Willem Dudok after the war and different architects designed blocks of flats.

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I’m not sure who was responsible for this particular one but its style is modernist with a touch of neoclassicism.

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[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #27

0148-laan-van-meerdervoort

Façades of two houses, Laan van Meerdervoort, with identical gables, although the one at the right-hand side lost its white topping.

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Built in 1891 in the usual eclectic style of the day.

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[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were taken in March 2016.

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #25

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Chinese arch, Wagenstraat.

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When i lived just round the corner near Wagenstraat in the 1980s, the whole area was a bit in the doldrums.

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It had lost its identity since long as it used to be a place where many Jews lived before they were deported during the German occupation.

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It was as if the municipal authorities didn’t really know what to do about it for some decades.

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When more and more Chinese settled in Wagenstraat and around, in the end it seemed the problem was solved by itself: it became The Hague China Town.

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Now street signs are both in Dutch and in Chinese, there are red Chinese lanterns in the streets and in 2009 two Chinese arches were erected of which this is the south-eastern one.

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The strange thing is, this all happened in a time when foreigners living in this country were supposed to stick to Dutch customs and to speak, write and understand Dutch.

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But of course in the case of China Town, the authorities smelled business.

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The arches are said to have been made of Chinese materials while the wooden top is said to consist of more than a thousand parts.

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[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

All pictures were taken in March 2016.

 

Bertus Pieters