Façades of The Hague #66

Apartment block Lübeckstraat corner 2de Sweelinckstraat.

Lübeckstraat is one of the streets that fell victim to the German Atlantic Wall during WWII.

The Dutch modernist architect Willem Dudok (1884-1974) made a master plan for the whole area for which different architects designed buildings in the 1950s.

I’m not sure who is responsible for this particular block but it has some fine details.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #65

Apartment building Laan van Meerdervoort corner Waldeck-Pyrmontkade.

Designed by Jan Olthuis – an architect who was born in the mid 19th century and who has designed more buildings in The Hague, but about whom not much is known biographically – it was built in 1902/1903 in the very decorative Art Nouveau style.

With its flamboyant cinnamon coloured engineering bricks and its tiled tableaus in pastel colours it is a real landmark at the crossroads of the two avenues.

In the 1930s shops were built on the ground floor.

Olthuis was responsible for the design of at least some of the tableaus.

The tiles themselves were produced by the firm ‘Thooft and Labouchere in its famous factory De Porceleyne Fles (internationally nowadays known as ‘Royal Delft’) in Delft. (the Dutch Cultural Heritage Agency wrongly states that the tiles were made by the Rozenburg ceramics factory in The Hague).

The building is a state monument and was restored in the 1990s and recently.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #64

Blocks of social housing Hoefkade corner Jacob Catsstraat, East side of the street.

Most of the neighbourhood dating from the end of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century was broken down in the 1980s and new housing was built.

The blocks on these pictures were designed by Álvaro Siza (1933), who had a good reputation in co-operating with future inhabitants of social housing projects, in collaboration with architects Jeroen Geurst (1960) and Rens Schulze (1960).

They were built in 1989-1993. In the rigorous gable of the block Siza very much stuck to the Dutch 19th century urban tradition of red-brown bricks and the Hague tradition of recesses with steep stairs in the façades.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #63

Façade of the building of painters’ association (‘schilderkundig genootschap’) Pulchri Studio, Lange Voorhout.

Originally built in the 16th century, it got its present appearance in the 18th century.

Many of its inhabitants had chic names, all but a few forgotten by now.

The building was bought by Pulchri Studio (‘For the Study of Beauty’; the association was founded in 1847) in 1896 and was opened by the association in 1901.

Pulchri Studio (in short Pulchri) still exists and the association’s building has some of the most wonderful exhibition spaces in The Hague, although it should be said that exhibitions not always live up to that magnificence.

On the other hand Pulchri is the grand old lady of The Hague art institutions and is a household name, which, as such, should be cherished.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #62

Façade of a three storey 18th century building with corbels in Louis XIV style, Wagenstraat. Shop front in a much later style.

The ground floor contained the famous HCAK (Haags Centrum voor Actuele Kunst – The Hague Centre for Contemporary Art) from the late 1970s onward, which was the first non-commercial artists run presentation platform in The Hague and one of the first in the Netherlands. Later it moved to Stille Veerkade (click here to see the place) where it continued its activities until the early 1990s.

It now houses a carpenter’s shop. The façade is a municipal monument.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #61

Façade with apartments and a shop front, Wagenstraat; originally 18th century and without the shop front, but it was redesigned first quarter 20th century, adding commercial space on the ground floor.

After different changes of the shop front it got its present character in the beginning of this century.

In spite of its attempt to be elegant the shop front looks too cheap to be in balance with the rest of the gable.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #60

West façade of railway station Den Haag Hollands Spoor, usually abbreviated to Den Haag HS (The Hague HS) or simply HS.

It was built in 1891 as a replacement of the smaller neo-classical station of the 1840s.

One of the two main railway stations in The Hague, HS is connecting The Hague with Leiden, Haarlem and Amsterdam to the north and with Delft, Rotterdam and Antwerp to the south.

It was designed by architect Dirk Margadant (1849-1915), who designed more station buildings, most of them replaced by modern buildings now (notably except for Haarlem).

“Hollandish Iron Railway Society”. With from left to right personifications of Science, Commerce, Industry and Art.

It was built in neo-renaissance style with a lot of decorations and emblems, illustrating speed, culture, science and economic progress, produced by Van den Bossche & Crevels in Amsterdam.

Being the city of the Royal court and the government, it was felt The Hague’s new station had to compete in grandeur with Amsterdam’s Centraal Station.

The biggest novelty of the building was the use of raised platforms with waiting rooms, which made the station hall itself less important and which may be nowadays a bit of a problem with the commercialisation of station halls.

The royal waiting room (the Koninklijk Paviljoen / Royal Pavilion) was however at street level in the north wing of the building and is still kept in old glory with its wooden doors under a marquise.

It has a relief showing the young Queen Wilhelmina surrounded by arts, science, progress, prosperity, etc.

In spite of recent restorations the royal pavilion is next to a somewhat undefined area.

The south wing has a new tunnel for pedestrians and cyclists, and also contains the bike storage.

Today The Hague HS is a state monument.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #59

Façade with apartments and on the ground floor a pub and an entrance to a church, Dunne Bierkade.

It was designed around 1912 by architect Willem Verschoor (1880 – 1968), who later became an important member of the so-called New Hague School (Nieuwe Haagse School).

Originally it was the house where landscape painter Jan van Goyen (1596-1656) lived until 1654 when his financial situation became so precarious that he moved to Wagenstraat around the corner.

From 1649 to 1654 his son in law, the famous genre painter Jan Steen (1625/26-1679), lived there too.

Nowadays it houses the locally well-known pub De Paas, which used to be one of my favourite haunts until the Financial Crisis of the last decade (but you may still find me there now and then).

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All pictures were made in March 2017

Bertus Pieters