Façades of The Hague #70

Villa Helena built in the mid 1930s, Nieuwe Parklaan, in a sober late art deco style.

Both chimneys were originally much taller, especially the one on the south-east facade (on the right hand side of the building) was very monumental.

With its small cosy front terrace it has been an old people’s home for some time.

Now it contains apartments.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

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Façades of The Hague #69

Façade of a narrow building with bay-window, Oude Molstraat, built in 1901.

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© Villa Next Door 2018

Both pictures were made in March 2016

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #68

Façade of a house with apartments, Balistraat.

It was built in 1891 in the then usual decorative, eclectic style.

Balistraat (Bali Street) took its name from the isle of Bali, one of the Lesser Sunda Islands in present day Indonesia; a reminder of Dutch colonial times.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Boor 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #67

Five meter high replica of a medieval jug as a monument for local archaeological finds, roundabout Oude Waalsdorperweg.

The monument was placed in February 2010.

Archaeological research has found that in the 13th century there was a farm in this area which was partly peat, partly sandy dunes.

Today the monument tries to make some sense of this anonymous and unwelcoming spot in the service of transport, technology, the military and international justice.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #66

Apartment block Lübeckstraat corner 2de Sweelinckstraat.

Lübeckstraat is one of the streets that fell victim to the German Atlantic Wall during WWII.

The Dutch modernist architect Willem Dudok (1884-1974) made a master plan for the whole area for which different architects designed buildings in the 1950s.

I’m not sure who is responsible for this particular block but it has some fine details.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #65

Apartment building Laan van Meerdervoort corner Waldeck-Pyrmontkade.

Designed by Jan Olthuis – an architect who was born in the mid 19th century and who has designed more buildings in The Hague, but about whom not much is known biographically – it was built in 1902/1903 in the very decorative Art Nouveau style.

With its flamboyant cinnamon coloured engineering bricks and its tiled tableaus in pastel colours it is a real landmark at the crossroads of the two avenues.

In the 1930s shops were built on the ground floor.

Olthuis was responsible for the design of at least some of the tableaus.

The tiles themselves were produced by the firm ‘Thooft and Labouchere in its famous factory De Porceleyne Fles (internationally nowadays known as ‘Royal Delft’) in Delft. (the Dutch Cultural Heritage Agency wrongly states that the tiles were made by the Rozenburg ceramics factory in The Hague).

The building is a state monument and was restored in the 1990s and recently.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #64

Blocks of social housing Hoefkade corner Jacob Catsstraat, East side of the street.

Most of the neighbourhood dating from the end of the 19th century and the first quarter of the 20th century was broken down in the 1980s and new housing was built.

The blocks on these pictures were designed by Álvaro Siza (1933), who had a good reputation in co-operating with future inhabitants of social housing projects, in collaboration with architects Jeroen Geurst (1960) and Rens Schulze (1960).

They were built in 1989-1993. In the rigorous gable of the block Siza very much stuck to the Dutch 19th century urban tradition of red-brown bricks and the Hague tradition of recesses with steep stairs in the façades.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #63

Façade of the building of painters’ association (‘schilderkundig genootschap’) Pulchri Studio, Lange Voorhout.

Originally built in the 16th century, it got its present appearance in the 18th century.

Many of its inhabitants had chic names, all but a few forgotten by now.

The building was bought by Pulchri Studio (‘For the Study of Beauty’; the association was founded in 1847) in 1896 and was opened by the association in 1901.

Pulchri Studio (in short Pulchri) still exists and the association’s building has some of the most wonderful exhibition spaces in The Hague, although it should be said that exhibitions not always live up to that magnificence.

On the other hand Pulchri is the grand old lady of The Hague art institutions and is a household name, which, as such, should be cherished.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

All pictures were taken in March 2017

Bertus Pieters