Tell Freedom; Kunsthal KAdE, Amersfoort

Buhlebezwe Siwani

I went to Kunsthal KAdE in Amersfoort to write a review for Villa La Repubblica about the show Tell Freedom, with works by 15 or 16 (it is ambiguous) young artists from South Africa. Click here to read the review (in Dutch) and see some more pictures.

Buhlebezwe Siwani

The lighting in KAdE was horrible for taking photos, and the few pictures i tried to take of Dineo Seshee Bopape’s works are so bad that i skipped them, for which i apologise. However you can see some pictures of her work at Witte de With in Rotterdam if you click here.

Buhlebezwe Siwani

In the mean time i hope these pics will inspire you to go and see the works in real, which i’d wholeheartedly recommend.

Buhlebezwe Siwani

Take your time though, as there’s a lot to be seen.

Haroon Gunn-Salie

Haroon Gunn-Salie, Aline Xavier

Haroon Gunn-Salie, Aline Xavier

Haroon Gunn-Salie, Aline Xavier

Haroon Gunn-Salie

Neo Matloga

Neo Matloga

Neo Matloga

Neo Matloga

Kemang Wa Lehulere

Kemang Wa Lehulere

Kemang Wa Lehulere

Kemang Wa Lehulere

Bronwyn Katz

Bronwyn Katz

Bronwyn Katz

Bronwyn Katz

Bronwyn Katz

Lerato Shadi

Lerato Shadi

Lerato Shadi

Lerato Shadi

Sabelo Mlangeni

Lebohang Kganye

Buhlebezwe Siwani

Mawande Ka Zenzile

Mawande Ka Zenzile

MADEYOULOOK

Nolan Oswald Dennis

Nolan Oswald Dennis

Nolan Oswald Dennis

Nolan Oswald Dennis

Nolan Oswald Dennis

Nolan Oswald Dennis

Lebohang Kganye

Lebohang Kganye

Francois Knoetze

Francois Knoetze

Francois Knoetze

Francois Knoetze

Francois Knoetze

Ashley Walters

Ashley Walters

Kemang Wa Lehulere

Donna Kukama

Donna Kukama

Donna Kukama

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Kunsthal KAdE, Amersfoort

Bertus Pieters

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Tirzo Martha, No Excuses!; Museum Beelden aan Zee, The Hague

Monument for Togetherness

No excuses indeed for having any later the first solo exhibition in the Netherlands of works by Curaçao artist Tirzo Martha (1965) in Museum Beelden aan Zee.

The Great Epiphany of Curaçao

The Great Epiphany of Curaçao

The Great Epiphany of Curaçao

The Great Epiphany of Curaçao

The Great Epiphany of Curaçao

Reinvention of the Afro-Era (Ananzi Colonialism)

Reinvention of the Afro-Era (Ananzi Colonialism)

Reinvention of the Afro-Era (Ananzi Colonialism)

Reinvention of the Afro-Era (Ananzi Colonialism)

Reinvention of the Afro-Era (Ananzi Colonialism)

Reinvention of the Afro-Era (Ananzi Colonialism)

Reinvention of the Afro-Era (Ananzi Colonialism)

God Is My Pilot

God Is My Pilot

Regarding the great impression his works, so generously full of details and narratives, make, you might think such a solo show is shamefully long overdue but you might also consider it to be just in time.

God Is My Pilot

God Is My Pilot

God Is My Pilot

Louis Vuitton Gang

Louis Vuitton Gang

Louis Vuitton Gang

Louis Vuitton Gang

Louis Vuitton Gang

Louis Vuitton Gang

Louis Vuitton Gang

Captain Caribbean: The Truth Will Set You Free

Captain Caribbean: The Truth Will Set You Free

Captain Caribbean: The Truth Will Set You Free

Captain Caribbean: The Truth Will Set You Free

Social and political commitment have become fashionable these days, usually to the detriment of content and expression.

Captain Caribbean: The Truth Will Set You Free

Captain Caribbean: The Truth Will Set You Free

The Banned Partnership

The Banned Partnership

The Banned Partnership

The Banned Partnership

The Banned Partnership

The Banned Partnership

The Great Caribbean Warp

The Great Caribbean Warp

The Great Caribbean Warp

The Great Caribbean Warp

The Consequence of Giving Me Carte Blanche At Plein Air

The Consequence of Giving Me Carte Blanche At Plein Air

Social and political commitment need a warm heart and an open and practical mind towards society, even in art.

The Consequence of Giving Me Carte Blanche At Plein Air

The Consequence of Giving Me Carte Blanche At Plein Air

The Consequence of Giving Me Carte Blanche At Plein Air

Ai Wei Wei, Sate Batata Hopi Sous

Ai Wei Wei, Sate Batata Hopi Sous

Ai Wei Wei, Sate Batata Hopi Sous

Ai Wei Wei, Sate Batata Hopi Sous

Ai Wei Wei, Sate Batata Hopi Sous

Ai Wei Wei, Sate Batata Hopi Sous

The Ancestral Debate

The Ancestral Debate

The Ancestral Debate

The Ancestral Debate

The Ancestral Debate

The Ancestral Debate

Martha clearly has both and he is able to combine joy and pain, sarcasm and tenderness, a feeling for both mysticism and sobriety, exuberance and balance, passion and humour in one work.

The Ancestral Debate

The Venus of Kawa Korsou

The Venus of Kawa Korsou

The Venus of Kawa Korsou

The Venus of Kawa Korsou

The Venus of Kawa Korsou

The Concept of Colonialism

The Concept of Colonialism

The Concept of Colonialism

The Concept of Colonialism

The Concept of Colonialism

The Prestige of the Ignorant

The Prestige of the Ignorant

The Prestige of the Ignorant

There is a certain order and an almost classical feeling for proportions and composition in his works that allow you to find the details and let them tell their stories.

The Prestige of the Ignorant

The Prestige of the Ignorant

The Prestige of the Ignorant

The Prestige of the Ignorant

The Prestige of the Ignorant

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

As for these details, they can be commonplace objects but also the way Martha assembles them, the way he constructs his works, the texts he uses and the way he uses them.

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

Chapel for Tirzo Martha

The Fall of the Afro Myth

The Fall of the Afro Myth

The Fall of the Afro Myth

The Fall of the Afro Myth

The Fall of the Afro Myth

The Fall of the Afro Myth

The Fall of the Afro Myth

Martha has also co-operated with students and people from the neighbourhood in one work called Monument of Togetherness.

The Fall of the Afro Myth

The Divine Ascent

The Divine Ascent

The Divine Ascent

The Divine Ascent

The Divine Ascent

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

It looks very open and transparent.

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Kiko Ta Nos Identidat

Monument of Togetherness

The whole show is well composed and presented.

Monument for Togetherness

Monument of Togetherness

Monument of Togetherness

Monument of Togetherness

Monument of Togetherness

Monument of Togetherness

Monument of Togetherness

Next week is the last week of this marvellous exhibition (already one of the very best in BaZ for this year as far as i’m concerned) so hurry up to take a closer look in BaZ if you haven’t done so yet.

Monument of Togetherness

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all pictures courtesy to Tirzo Martha and Museum Beelden aan Zee, Den Haag.

Bertus Pieters

Maaike Schoorel, London | Rome | New York | Amsterdam; GEM, The Hague

As it happened, i entered GEM to see Maaike Schoorel’s (1973) show together with a couple.

The man walked around for a few seconds, came back to his lady and said it’s all empty spaces, there’s really nothing to be seen in these paintings.

The lady smiled at me understandingly and said well, somebody has to paint that too and they left the exhibition.

Maybe painting just wasn’t the couple’s cup of tea.

On the other hand it also shows what is going on in Schoorel’s paintings.

She makes abstractions of common themes like interiors, still lifes, portraits etc, usually based on photographs.

Her ways of abstraction are purely intuitive.

She minimalises the information, but not in a minimalist way.

Whether you recognise the picture or not isn’t really important.

In a way they all look like moments of just awakening, the moment you start looking, but still not realising what you really see.

Or they are like loud music heard from far.

When making pictures of these paintings i realised that photographs won’t give you any idea of them.

That is my regular conclusion, but with Schoorel’s work this is all the more true.

I am a great admirer of these works, but Schoorel’s way of painting may also become a kind of mannerism.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Maaike Schoorel and GEM, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Bieke Depoorter, As it may be; The Hague Museum for Photography

In its basement The Hague Museum for Photography shows works by Bieke Depoorter (1986) from her recent collection As it may be.

Depoorter tried to look behind the front doors of Egyptians to give a more intimate view of Egyptian daily life.

They have become delicate, sensitive and very rich pictures of a daily world that is unknown to outsiders.

During a later visit she has asked Egyptians to write their reactions about the photographs in the pictures themselves.

That is an interesting turn in what would otherwise be a more or less exotic, ethnographic series, rich in detail and beautiful as it is.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Contents of all photographs courtesy to Bieke Depoorter and The Hague Museum for Photography

 

Bertus Pieters

Hans Eijkelboom, Identities 1970 – 2017; The Hague Museum of Photography

Since the 1960s Western Europe is living in the age of consumerism which is now our all pervading way of life.

To maintain or build an identity has become something for the market as well.

You might be mistaken that identity is a matter of religion, nationality, ethnicity or whatever.

Forget it, identities are simply bought these days, they are trade.

That is most obvious in your clothing.

Observing people’s struggle to have an identity due to or in spite of the market has been and still is Hans Eijkelboom’s (1949) main subject as a photographer.

The Museum of Photography shows a retrospective of his work.

There are his early projects where he often plays a role himself in front of the camera, while his later sequences where he compares people wearing the same kind of cloths are also extensively present.

Eijkelboom doesn’t judge his subjects, he just observes them and seems to be constantly amazed by the commonness of his fellow human beings and the way they try to escape that commonness.

Hans Eijkelboom 19

There is a dry but not wry sense of humour in his works.

Everybody who is interested in how we look alike and how we don’t in our public lives – as i do –  should see this.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to Hans Eijkelboom and The Hague Museum of Photography.

 

Bertus Pieters

Jean Arp: The Poetry of Forms; Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo

Last Sunday i visited the Kröller-Müller Museum to see the Jean (or Hans) Arp (1886 – 1966) exhibition.

The works themselves are of course wonderful, there is an introductory movie with Arp being interviewed in Strasbourg (his city of birth), the explanatory texts on the walls are quite good and there are even poems by Arp (he was a very important and influential European poet as well) on the walls.

Poem by Tristan Tzara, illustration by Hans Arp

However, the way Arp talks about his works are completely contradicted by their presentation in the museum’s galleries.

All works, even the reliefs on the walls, are in glass showcases, which gives you the idea that you are looking at stuffed animals or at fossils, while Arp’s works should have the freedom to have a lot of space around them.

Moreover, each sculpture has its own pedestal.

It is of course understandable that these works have to be protected while the public is allowed to examine them at close distance, but now the show looks a bit, well, unpleasantly  bizarre.

On the other hand it is great to see so many examples of Arp’s works and of his artistic development, and every lover of 20th century art should see this show (the show is in its last week!).

This short blog photo report was made, thanks to the kind and cordial support of Rien Monshouwer and Karin van der Werff.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Museum Kröller-Müller, Otterlo and the owners of the works.

 

Bertus Pieters

Edward Krasinski; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

I visited the great retrospective exhibition of Edward Krasiński’s work at the Amsterdam Stedelijk Museum to write a review for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

The presentation at the Stedelijk is a more or less chronological one which i followed.

Those who have never heard of Krasiński (1925–2004) should see this exhibition absolutely (as should those who have).

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the owners of the works and to Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam

 

Bertus Pieters

Skulptur Projekte, Münster (North Rhine-Westphalia); Day 2

Click here to read the review of Skulptur Projekte 2017 on Villa La Repubblica (in Dutch). Click here to see pictures of the first day of our visit to Münster on Villa Next Door.

The next morning we took a fresh look at what we still wanted to see.

As the Cherry Column by Thomas Schütte (1954) of the 1987 edition of Skulptur Projekte was round the corner we went to see that one. In the small square where Schütte’s cherries are, there is a sandpit at the moment, where children are playing in the sunshine.

En route we visited St. Lambert’s Church, originally built late 14th century and first half of the 15th century with a late 19th century neo-gothic spire.

During WWII the spire, roof and choir were damaged, but the church was reconstructed after the war in the 1950s.

From gothic and neo-gothic to a disco to celebrate German super kitsch, well, what is the difference?

Brazilian duo Bárbara Wagner (1980) and Benjamin de Búrca (1975) made a film about the German Schlager phenomenon and show it in the Elephant Lounge disco.

Empty by daytime the disco has a strangely artificial atmosphere, the kitschy atmosphere where visitors celebrate kitsch both to forget and in recognition of daily hardships.

And then, passing the originally 13th century Apostelkirche (Apostle Church) to the Theater Münster, one of the first modern theatres built in Germany after WWII, to see Matrix by Studio CAMP, about which i commented in the review at VLR.

Passing along the cathedral we had a closer look at the bronze crucifix group by Bert Gerresheim (1935) we saw the evening before.

It was erected in 2004 and has to do with the catholic history of the city, presenting historical figures of Münster.

Clearly the hanging Christ was inspired by the Isenheim Altar by Matthias Grünewald of 1515 (Musée d’Unterlinden, Colmar).

Near the museum you may find a work by Richard Tuttle (1941), Art and Music I and II of the 1987 edition.

They look like apostrophes or like F-clefs and are positioned on either side of a wall.

They are in a more or less anonymous alley in the city centre.

They look very unobtrusive.

On the wall somebody tells you that pornography is violence.

On the floor there happened to be more objects that reminded me of works by Tuttle (an artist i highly esteem, by the way).

Not far away from there, on a lawn alongside the late 16th century (and partly very late gothic) Petrikirche (St. Peter’s Church), is Cut Dolomite by Ulrich Rückriem (1938) from the very first edition of Skulptur Projekte in 1977.

As usual Rückriem’s method of simply cutting and rearranging a rock never seems to fail in its monumentality.

The work easily becomes one with its environment and gives it strength.

Very near along the River Aa is a very small but wonderful work by Giovanni Anselmo (1934):

Shortened Heavens of the 1987 edition.

Verkürzter Himmel (Shortened Heavens) is engraved on top, almost defying everything over it, and bringing Heaven back to Earth, so to say.

From the same edition is The Meadow Smiles or The Face in the Wall by Harald Klingelhöller (1954) in the courtyard of the law faculty of the city’s university.

It exists of mirrors and yew trees behind it.

You may or may not think it is in the shape of a smile, but it brings a smile to anyone’s face anyway, without being explicitly humorous or hilarious.

The many-sidedness of Klingelhöller’s work may also signify a difference between the law faculty and the theology faculty where Anselmo’s work is.

Here some tourist is trying to fix me into his holiday album.

Not all art of the present edition is convincing, like this cartoon-like work by Sany (Samuel Nyholm, 1973), which seems to be funny.

Back to the museum there is a new encounter with the fine building and Rückriem’s Granite (Normandy) (1985), here in combination with Moore’s sculpture, Bonin’s and Burr’s installation and over it Gerdes’ Angst (see the report of day 1).

At the car park (we decided to take the car to see the rest) there is a fresco on a façade called 500 Jahre Kolonialisierung und Widerstand (500 Years of Colonisation and Resistance) made in the Columbus year 1992 by an untraceable Colombian artist called Saúl Gutiérrez.

I wrote in my review on VLR about this work by Schütte, which is one of my favourites.

This is not art but the air conditioning of the LBS building, but even so it’s quite impressive.

In the building Hito Steyerl (1966) presents her HellYeahWeFuckDie.

I like her essays but i haven’t been a fan of her visual art and i’m afraid this work didn’t change my mind.

Maybe it would be interesting as an illustration of an essay.

In the park nearby is the 2007 edition’s We are still and reflective by Martin Boyce (1967). Its straight lines may remind you of a jigsaw puzzle, but also of the abstracted shapes of trees.

It’s a wonderful work somewhere in between a drawing and a sculpture and it works well with the shades of trees over it.

Again, not an official work of art but under the circumstances anything may become a sculpture in Münster.

The winter sports hall with the magnificent installation (installation doesn’t seem to be the right word for this living diorama)  After ALife Ahead by Pierre Huyghe (1962) was our last stop in Münster.

I wrote extensively about it in the VLR review.

I hope to live to see the next edition of Skulptur Projekte in 2027!

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy top the artists

Many thanks to Jean van Wijk and Marion de Korte.

Bertus Pieters