Hans Lemmen, Walkabout; Galerie Helder, The Hague

The present exhibition of works by Hans Lemmen (1959) at Helder has some unexpected and absurdist turns right from the beginning when entering the gallery up to the patio (no picture of that one included here, so you have to go and see for yourself) at the end of the show.

Lemmen’s work seems to be dug up, either from the soil or from the mind.

That is why you may find hand axes shining like diamonds, but the spade too with which they were dug up looks unworldly as well as earthly.

There is a marvelous big drawing of a gently sloping landscape,  well plowed in an orderly manner, but full of hidden history and of high voltage pylons to keep everything ‘under the net’.

But clearly, in Lemmen’s works things just don’t want to stay ‘under the net’.

They are full of pleasant – or maybe unpleasant – awkwardness.

Some works look like moments in which things happen beyond control, as if a higher power is playing with sensitivities, history and the present, moments of love, beauty, death and destruction, just for the fun of it.

Just as the gods did when the world was still polytheistic.

There is also a cabinet with drawers full of drawings and objects – with amongst others the catalogue of the project Lemmen did together with American photographer, working in South Africa, Roger Ballen (1950) .

You will probably want to see them all, but you may also get the feeling that they don’t want to see you.

Helder is usually very good at making exhibitions, but it seems this show has more or less made itself.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to Hans Lemmen and Galerie Helder, Den Haag

Bertus Pieters

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Inez Smit, Marena Seeling, Lines, form, spaces and other; Galerie Helder, The Hague

Inez Smit

Galerie Helder shows paintings by two artists, Inez Smit (1967) and Marena Seeling (1953), who make abstract work.

Inez Smit

Inez Smit

Inez Smit

While works of both artists go very well together, the show is also a dialogue of differences.

Inez Smit

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

Seeling’s work derives from vast polder landscapes, abstracted until only its light and space remain, even in the smallest works.

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

In Smit’s works space seems to be rediscovered in non-objective compositions.

Inez Smit

Inez Smit

It is a modest exhibition, but it has a lot of perspectives to offer.

Inez Smit

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

©Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Galerie Helder, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Ari Bayuaji, Hide and Seek; Galerie Helder, The Hague

Galerie Helder has moved to showing solo presentations and the present exhibition of works by Ari Bayuaji (1975) is a very subtle one indeed.

Bayuaji links social criticism to lyricism which makes his works objects of reflection.

Bayuaji, who comes from Bali but now lives in Canada, reflects amongst others on censorship, the position of women, remembrance and the history of places one may call either home or an exotic destiny.

With Bayuaji Helder brings a valuable way of seeing to The Hague and very different from what is regularly on show.

Meanwhile Bayuaji also has a presentation in the Kunsthal in Rotterdam

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Aru Bayuaji and Galerie Helder, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Wim Bosch, ‘You can tell that from here’; Galerie Helder, The Hague

“Our relationship with reality and life is that same relationship that exists between the satellite image and the actual earth.”

Luigi Ghirri in Kodachrome, 1978

The title of Wim Bosch’s present show at Helder gallery, reminds me somehow of Ghirri’s remark and, in a way, Bosch’s work also does.

In Ghirri’s context he is talking about the deletion of space around the photographed object.

Because of this deletion the photograph takes on meaning, according to Ghirri.

Bosch seems to draw some specific consequences from that fact in his latest photo works, some of them made of found footage.

In his works the deletion has already taken place in an earlier stage, after which the meaning and content is warped, but in the mind of the viewer the reality it is taken from still plays a role.

Photographic aesthetics has lately taken a new and interesting shape in Bosch’s photos and there is some earlier work on show to compare it with as well.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Wim Bosch and Galerie Helder, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Spring of Drawing; Helder, The Hague

Stephan van den Burg

Stephan van den Burg

Stephan van den Burg

Stephan van den Burg

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

At first sight Helder’s present show may look unassuming, but to an extent it is a kind of statement about the diversity and combination of drawings it wants to present.

Marena Seeling

Marena Seeling

Romy Muijrers

Romy Muijrers

Romy Muijrers

Romy Muijrers

They range from the works purely drawn from the use of basic graphic techniques, to lyrical or socio-politically motivated drawings.

Romy Muijrers

Romy Muijrers

Sigrid van Woudenberg

Sigrid van Woudenberg

Harry Markusse

Harry Markusse

Helder has a special interest in artists who combine thinking and making, technique and lyricism and not in the kind of expressionism that seems to come right from the gut.

Harry Markusse

Harry Markusse

Maryanto

Maryanto

Niels Janssen

Niels Janssen

As such Spring of Drawing shows a great diversity of drawings that combine very well.

Niels Janssen

Niels Janssen

Niels Janssen

Niels Janssen

Guy Vording

Guy Vording

Go and take a look if you don’t believe it (and if you do…).

Guy Vording

Guy Vording

Sigrid van Woudenberg

Sigrid van Woudenberg

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to the artists and Helder gallery, The Hague.

Bertus Pieters

Rolf.fr & Frank van der Salm: Out of time, out of space; Galerie Helder, The Hague

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To end 2016 and to open 2017 Helder gallery shows objects by Studio Rolf.fr and photography by Frank van der Salm.

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Helder lives up to its motto ‘art and living’.

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Rolf.fr not just shows objects made from themselves or from other objects, but also alternative furniture.

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Frank van der Salm’s photography literally gives an extra dimension to Rolf.fr’s furniture, the out-of-space-dimension so to say.

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Moreover both Rolf and Van der Salm give an alternative and very inspiring view on art and living that may put our fragmented daily reality into a new order.

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[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of pictures courtesy to Rolf.fr, Frank van der Salm and Galerie Helder.

 

Bertus Pieters

Landscape and the City; Galerie Helder, The Hague

Yves Beaumont

Yves Beaumont

Due to circumstances i am a bit late reporting about this exhibition in Helder gallery about space in the human world, with works by Yves Beaumont, Bart Benschop, Demiak and Pär Strömberg.

Yves Beaumont

Yves Beaumont

Eelke van Willegen

Eelke van Willegen

Demiak

Demiak

Although the works of these artists differ a lot from each other it has become quite an atmospheric show.

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Bart Benschop

Pär Strömberg

Pär Strömberg

Later on some works by Melle Aussems, Jhonie van Boeijen and Eelke van Willegen have been added in the moveable cross-over space of the gallery.

Eelke van Willegen

Eelke van Willegen

Bart Benschop

Bart Benschop

Melle Aussems

Melle Aussems

October 30 will be the last day of the exhibition, so hurry up to see it!

Jhonie van Boeijen

Jhonie van Boeijen

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Content of all pictures courtesy to the artists and Galerie Helder

Bertus Pieters

Art The Hague 2016; Fokker terminal, The Hague

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Art fairs aren’t the most exciting places to see real surprises and Art The Hague is no exception, in spite of it calling itself ‘quirky’.

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To be honest, compared to last year the ascending line seems to have levelled.

Klaas Gubbels - Rento Brattinga

Klaas Gubbels – Rento Brattinga

Pieter de Krom - Vonkel

Pieter de Krom – Vonkel

In the offices next to the hangar (places where you might expect something interesting in the very short tradition of this fair in this place) there is little reason for excitement.

Marie Pop - Vonkel

Marie Pop – Vonkel

Ko Aarts - Rento Brattinga

Ko Aarts – Rento Brattinga

Johannes Langkamp - A Gallery Named Sue

Johannes Langkamp – A Gallery Named Sue

Although some interesting items are on show, the arrangements are a bit messy (the best presentations are the rooms of Livingstone gallery and Rento Brattinga), and the Blueprint presentation shouldn’t even be mentioned.

Auke de Vries - Nouvelles Images

Auke de Vries – Nouvelles Images

Auke de Vries - Nouvelles Images

Auke de Vries – Nouvelles Images

Auke de Vries - Nouvelles Images

Auke de Vries – Nouvelles Images

Auke de Vries - Nouvelles Images

Auke de Vries – Nouvelles Images

Central to the hangar, which serves as the main hall, is Nouvelles Images gallery’s presentation of works by Auke de Vries, one of the grand old men of Dutch sculpture.

Lotte van Lieshout - Galerie Wit

Lotte van Lieshout – Galerie Wit

Ruben Terlou - Galerie Fontana

Ruben Terlou – Galerie Fontana

Ruben Terlou - Galerie Fontana

Ruben Terlou – Galerie Fontana

Miranda Meijer - A Gallery Named Sue

Miranda Meijer – A Gallery Named Sue

Hernán Ardila Delgado - A Gallery Named Sue

Hernán Ardila Delgado – A Gallery Named Sue

Geert Baas - Galerie Ramakers

Geert Baas – Galerie Ramakers

Eric de Vries - WTC Rotterdam Art Gallery

Eric de Vries – WTC Rotterdam Art Gallery

Further on in the hangar it was the usual stuff, including – of course – some real gems.

Kevin Bauer - Galerie Helder

Kevin Bauer – Galerie Helder

Micha Patiniott - Heden

Micha Patiniott – Heden

Summer Matthews - Aboriginal Art Gallery

Summer Matthews – Aboriginal Art Gallery

Coen Vernooij - Gallery 0-68

Coen Vernooij – Gallery 0-68

Coen Vernooij - Gallery 0-68

Coen Vernooij – Gallery 0-68

Unknown artist - WTC The Hague Art Gallery

Unknown artist – WTC The Hague Art Gallery

Marc Mulders - Galerie Dom'Arte

Marc Mulders – Galerie Dom’Arte

Still, i know it is a hell of a job organising an annual art fair, but it would be about time to outgrow a bit the sedate image of this town.

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

However, the best place to be is outside and behind the building: it’s Dirty Daisies, a co-operation of 15 artists from The Hague and Amsterdam.

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

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Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies is curated by Steef Crombach and there is some good stuff on show.

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

The artists are: Candela Bado, Zeno Beikircher, Yair Callender, Daniel Dmyszewicz, Frederik & Jacob, Doris Hardeman, Josje Hattink, Bas Kaufmann, Koolen & Van de Lande, Tobias Lengkeek, Leslie Nagel, Jeannette Slütter, Marnix van Uum and Victor Yudaev.

Dirty Daisies

Dirty Daisies

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Content of all pictures courtesy to the artists and galleries

 

Bertus Pieters