Michel Hoogervorst, studio visit, The Hague

During his exhibition Guess Things Happen That Way at Galerie Ramakers (click here for some pictures of that show), Michel Hoogervorst (1961) has opened his studio over the weekends. So i visited him last Sunday.

The studio is in one of the many late 19th century apartments in my own neighbourhood, so it was a visit just round the corner.

Apart from seeing his works in a studio setting, you can also admire a big wall painting which he changes almost completely every week.

Almost, as some details are maintained.

It is like the growing process he often shows in his paintings: there is an end to it and also the wall painting’s last version will disappear.

Happily some accurate photographs of the different versions have been made.

Things happen that way too.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Michel Hoogervorst

 

Bertus Pieters

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Studio visit: Jan Hoogervorst

Jan Hoogervorst 01

Last week I visited Jan Hoogervorst’s studio, where he has a modest presentation of works he made recently.

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A studio presentation is usually less photogenic than a gallery presentation, so my camera had a bit of a bad time, but I was amazed by what I saw nevertheless.

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Central to Hoogervorst’s present work is the idea that the human brain and will, let alone our other body functions, are not as free as we would like them to be.

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As a consequence our choices and ideas are not as free as we pretend.

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In his i-pad paintings, pencil drawings and woodcuts Hoogervorst is trying to make a kind of scans of that mechanism of un-freedom.

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Technically they also seem to be inspired by that idea.

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Hoogervorst uses all his technical skills as a draughtsman and graphic artist to improvise visions that could be revealing.

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Jan Hoogervorst 10

One might easily think the results would be sarcastic, but I don’t think they are, as Hoogervorst is obviously trying to steer clear of any moralizing.

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The ideas become even more intricate in his interior drawings, where the human body reacts to its environment.

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These works are multi-interpretable as you may see the perception of the protagonists of the space around them and the interpretation of the artist, as well as your own interpretation.

Jan Hoogervorst, i-pad painting, print

Jan Hoogervorst, i-pad painting, print

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters