Concepts of Time; National Archaeology Museum, Hooglandse Kerkgracht, LUMC, Leiden

Juliaan Andeweg

This year’s Beelden in Leiden (Sculptures in Leiden) summer show is called Concepts of Time as the venerable National Archaeological Museum (Rijksmuseum van Oudheden) in the city is celebrating its two hundred years anniversary.

Juliaan Andeweg

Part of the exhibition is on show in the museum and that is where i started my own visit.

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg (1986) surely was lucky being able to install his work in the Museum’s Egyptian temple.

Juliaan Andeweg

Works by other artists are on show in a separate hall.

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos (1980) made a sculpture specially for the exhibition in his by now well known vocabulary full of inner conflict and search for harmony.

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets (1983) undeniably has a place in a show in the Archaeological Museum full of mythology.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster (1987) is also an artist that springs to mind when thinking about archaeology and time.

Emma van der Put

Emma van der Put

Emma van der Put’s (1988) video is about sculpture and the instability of vision.

Bastienne Kramer

Bastienne Kramer (1961) has a wall for a series of small objects based on the feminine in sculpture from the early days of humanity up to the present.

Bastienne Kramer

There are also two big sculptures by her on show.

Daniëlle van Ark

Daniëlle van Ark (1974) gives a photographic reinterpretation of Michelangelo’s David’s hand.

Bastienne Kramer

Bastienne Kramer

Jasper Hagenaar

Painter Jasper Hagenaar (1977) paints his own self imagined mythologies.

Jasper Hagenaar

The exhibition in the museum is modest but diverse and may give the visitor to the museum some interesting afterthoughts about the present as part of history and archaeology.

Damian Kapojos

Beelden in Leiden’s home base is Hooglandse Kerkgracht, a closed canal turned into an intimate, leafy avenue.

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

Damian Kapojos

At the north end of the canal the show starts with another, bigger work by Kapojos, like the one in the museum looking like a complete cosmos elegantly kept in balance.

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yair Callender

Yaïr Callender (1987) is still in his mood of floating, sleeping, dreaming and the world of mythology and mystique it creates.

Jonathan van Doornum

Jonathan van Doornum

One of the more severe works (but uncertain about the will of a stern god) is by Jonathan van Doornum (1987).

Rein Verhoef

Rein Verhoef

Rein Verhoef

There is a certain strictness in this work by Rein Verhoef (1989) too, but of quite a different kind; it looks quite self-evident and the care with which it is made, makes it almost sensual.

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

In her fountain-like work Smeets tries to find yet another basic narrative language.

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels

Robbert Pauwels (1983) made a batman as a sentinel, his ears vaguely reminiscing the guarding Anubis’ ears.

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen

Daniel van Straalen (1987) apparently used Indo-Pacific carving as the base for two poles painted completely white, standing to wait for ancestors that still have to be born.

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

Juliaan Andeweg

In Andeweg’s installation i missed the promised “bottle with imitation water,” but it is all the more intriguing.

Lillian Vlaun

Lillian Vlaun (1993) quasi-reconstructed a vase in materials that are not what they seem to be.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Koster has an ornamented circle or lid in front of the magnificent gothic facade of the north transept of the 15th century Hooglandse Kerk; the scarab on the circle being a reminder of time.

Lillian Vlaun

The Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC) is the third venue for Concepts of Time.

Alexandra Hunts & Anna Fijnstein

The place, although sympathetic, is not photography friendly, so here is a choice of the more or less photographable works.

Alexandra Hunts & Anna Fijnstein

Alexandra Hunts (1990) and Anna Frijstein (1991) made a number of variations on the Willendorf Venus.

Sander van Noort

Sander van Noort (1986), originally a painter, now also makes sculptures based on classical sculpture.

Jonathan van Doornum

Jasper Hagenaar

Sander van Noort

Camile Smeets

Camile Smeets

Bas de Wit

There are also sculptures by Bas de Wit (1977) who seem to lead a life apart from reality.

Jasper Hagenaar

Bas de Wit

Daniëlle van Ark

Nynke Koster

Generally curator Sandrine van Noort (curator of the LUMC art collection) has made a very strong choice, avoiding easy sentimentalism and easy art that should appeal to different target audiences.

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

Nynke Koster

There is a strong sense of history being part of the contemporary world, and there is place for mysticism, mythology and ideas about craftsmanship in present day art practice.

Nynke Koster

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2018

Content of all photographs courtesy to the artists and Beelden in Leiden.

Bertus Pieters

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A Blue Room, Quartair, The Hague

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At Quartair eight artists were invited to reflect artistically on quotations from the oeuvre of Louis Couperus (1863-1923), one of the greatest novelists in the Dutch language. The artists were free to choose from Couperus’ works.

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Wieteke Heldens chose from The Tour (Antiek toerisme) and Ecstacy (Extaze), collected from these texts all words indicating a colour and tried to reproduce them in two paintings.

EBK 05 Robbert Pauwels
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Robbert Pauwels, who likes using pedestals for his works and referring to classical and baroque sculpture,

EBK 07 Robbert Pauwels
EBK 08 Robbert Pauwels

appropriately took a passage from the novella Psyche to make his Psyche and Eros.

EBK 09 Geeske Harting

Couperus, as a real fin de siècle novelist, was refined and often described the tarnishing or decay of beauty. Geeske Harting was

EBK 10 Geeske Harting

clearly inspired by that element in her surprising diptych Spleen with withering violets, which she based on parts of About me and others (Van en over mijzelf en anderen).

EBK 11 Astrid Nobel
EBK 12 Astrid Nobel

Astrid Nobel chose three passages from Metamorphosis (Metamorfoze) for her work Niet meer hetzelfde (Not the same anymore, based on the quote “It was the same as what had been and still: not the same anymore”) and she combines different other elements of the text in it.

EBK 13 Tim Breukers
EBK 14 Tim Breukers

Vert de l’abîme (sorry to say, but it is vertige de l’abîme) by Tim Breukers is based on a trifle called The binoculars (De binocle) about an opera visitor who, sitting high in a balcony seat,

EBK 15 Tim Breukers
EBK 16 Tim Breukers

can hardly resist throwing his opera glasses on a bald head deep down in the opera hall during a Walküre staging. Indeed Breukers creates a real abîme with a leftover of his visit to the top, where he could have… might have….

EBK 17 Hans Hoekstra

Hans Hoekstra’s painting Van Oudijcks val (Van Oudijck’s Fall) is based on the final part of the novel The Hidden Force (De stille kracht) where a high officer in the colonial Dutch East Indies, Van Oudijck, a man with phlegmatic Dutch authority, is worn out completely by the country and its magic.

EBK 18 Hans Hoekstra

Although the theme is clear in the otherwise attractive painting, I don’t really see the link to the story in particular to Van Oudijck.

EBK 19 Selma van Panhuis
EBK 20 Selma van Panhuis

Selma van Panhuis had herself inspired by a passage from Footsteps of Fate (Noodlot) with one of the novel’s protagonists thinking about his mistrust of human intuition.

EBK 21 Selma van Panhuis
EBK 22 Selma van Panhuis

Surely Van Panhuis shows the power of intuition which is part of her work and as such she shows you can’t escape from fate.

EBK 23 Pim Voorneman
EBK 24 Pim Voorneman
EBK 25 Pim Voorneman

Pim Voorneman shows in his installation Pièce de milieu, based on a passage from Ecstacy, the sensuousness of objects in a stifling bourgeois interior as it is often described by Couperus in his great novels.

Geeske Harting

Geeske Harting

Altogether this is a very fine exhibition curated within a very original framework, appropriately staged in The Hague, as Couperus often described the upper middle class of The Hague in his books.

Astrid Nobel

Astrid Nobel

There is an audio tour available in which you can hear all relevant passages from Couperus’ books as read by Philip Peters. Alas, it is in Dutch only, but hearing Peters pronounce all the different colours for Heldens’ paintings must be a feast to anyone’s ears.

EBK 28
[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

Bertus Pieters