Anatole De Benedictis, Stagger; Heden, The Hague

Anatole De Benedictis graduated from the Royal Academy in The Hague last year with a remarkable presentation.

Stagger at Heden is his first solo presentation since then.

It is a small one, but just as remarkable.

As De Benedictis is trying to get to grips with the world and society around us, he also presents a work by his colleague Bas Kaufmann (who also graduated last year).

Showing great potential, i’d be interested to see what he would present in a much bigger space.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to the artists and Heden, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Façades of The Hague #39

Apartment block, Lübeckstraat, built in the early 1950s. This block was part of the refurbishment of the area occupied by the German Atlantic Wall during WWII

The area was redesigned by architect Willem Dudok after the war and different architects designed blocks of flats, probably for different income groups. This block has a more or less chic look, with front gardens for the ground floor apartments, and stylish front doors with columns.

I’m not sure who designed the building.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

All [pictures were taken in March 2016

 

Bertus Pieters

Suzie van Staaveren, Shapeshifters; Heden, The Hague

Since Suzie van Staaveren graduated from the Royal Academy in The Hague last year, especially her many-coloured bricks have become relatively popular.

In her present exhibition at Heden she shows new attractive compositions, which can be partly changed and as such they can look both familiar and special.

The colours are very nuanced, varying from warm to very soft.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Suzie van Staaveren and Heden, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Sjoerd Knibbeler, Travelling past matter; LhGWR, The Hague

I visited Sjoerd Knibbeler’s present show Travelling past matter at LhGWR to write a review for Villa La Repubblica. Click here to read the review (in Dutch).

As i have written quite extensively about the exhibition, i leave you here with some snapshots and with the warm recommendation to take your time and visit it.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Sjoerd Knibbeler and LhGWR, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Wim Bosch, ‘You can tell that from here’; Galerie Helder, The Hague

“Our relationship with reality and life is that same relationship that exists between the satellite image and the actual earth.”

Luigi Ghirri in Kodachrome, 1978

The title of Wim Bosch’s present show at Helder gallery, reminds me somehow of Ghirri’s remark and, in a way, Bosch’s work also does.

In Ghirri’s context he is talking about the deletion of space around the photographed object.

Because of this deletion the photograph takes on meaning, according to Ghirri.

Bosch seems to draw some specific consequences from that fact in his latest photo works, some of them made of found footage.

In his works the deletion has already taken place in an earlier stage, after which the meaning and content is warped, but in the mind of the viewer the reality it is taken from still plays a role.

Photographic aesthetics has lately taken a new and interesting shape in Bosch’s photos and there is some earlier work on show to compare it with as well.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Wim Bosch and Galerie Helder, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Rutger van der Tas, Een ode aan de verwarde man (An Ode to the Disturbed Man); Twelve twelve gallery, The Hague

In a remarkable turn in his work, Rutger van der Tas (1980), a painter, is now reaching for three-dimensionality.

However, his works are still paintings as can be seen in his present show at Twelve Twelve gallery.

As the title of the show indicates, his work is all about disturbance as life is often – even for the greatest possible mutton head – a painful business.

Figures are deconstructed and reconstructed in colours that indicate both the pain and force of life, and so do the jigsaw puzzle-like cuts in the works which show that nothing is stable in life.

Watching the three-dimensional works, i was just wandering how they would look like if they were life sized, as they look quite monumental.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Rutger van der Tas and Twelve Twelve gallery, Den Haag

 

Bertus Pieters

Esther van der Wallen, photographs; Victor Laurentius Gallery, The Hague

At Lange Vijverberg 2, just next to the Mauritshuis Museum and with a fine view of the Hofvijver, photographer Esther van der Wallen has a small exhibition in Laurentius Gallery, which is residing there for the moment in the building’s piano nobile.

It may not be the best place to show your work, but in a way Van der Wallen’s photo’s fit well in this ultra-Haguish room.

It’s a bit of a salon, a bit chic, a bit tatty, may be just the right atmosphere for Van der Wallen’s pictures.

[Click on the pictures to enlarge]

© Villa Next Door 2017

Content of all pictures courtesy to Esther van der Wallen and Victor Laurentius Gallery

 

Bertus Pieters